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Medicine



ClinicalKey Updates Coming Soon…

ClinicalKey is about to get a makeover. The enhancements are due to be released on July 14. Here are some of the main changes to keep an eye out for:

  • New topic page summaries – more than 1,400 high level disease condition overviews. Content is pulled from frequently updated textbooks. Updates will occur any time there’s a new edition or chapter. Related content is hyperlinked.
  • The ability to search and browse by content type, including First Consult.
  • Mobile optimization.
  • Greater customization of patient education materials. Select a language, change the font size, and add your own notes.
  • An expanded “Presentation Maker” enables ClinicalKey account holders to create and manage multiple presentations.

Take a peek at the new look here:

Search screen

New ClinicalKey

Topic page

ClinicalKey topic page

Welcome, Residents!

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Hello! It was nice talking with you today! If you want a few more details about the library or a recap of some of the things I mentioned earlier, please watch this short video. Feel free to contact me if you have any questions.hubnet resources for youtube

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Sign up today for a bioinformatics workshop!

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Introduction to Blast -  The Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLAST)  is a combination statistical and mathematical equation created by the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI).  The BLAST suite offers a set of tools for identifying areas of similarity between various kinds of genomic and protein sequences as well as specialized BLAST tools for Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR), comparing sequences, identifying mutations, sequences binding molecules such as drugs and more.

 

Instructor: Dr. Diane Rein

Location: TBD – South Campus

Date: Thursday, June 26, 2014

Time: 1:00 PM – 4:00 PM

Registration: http://ubtlc.buffalo.edu/workshops/workshop.asp?EventID=2013

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Advanced BLAST:   This course will be an extension of the Introduction to BLAST building on the skills learned in the Introduction to BLAST.  This course will cover working with nucleotide BLAST, Assigning biological function to your unknown sequence and specialized BLAST functions.

 

Instructor: Dr. Diane Rein

Location: TBD  - South Campus

Date: Monday, July 7, 2014

Time: 1:00 PM – 4:00 PM

Registration: http://ubtlc.buffalo.edu/workshops/workshop.asp?EventID=2014

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UCSC Genome Browser Workshop- The UCSC Genome Browser permits researchers to rapidly browse a large number of vertebrate, invertebrate, microbial and model organism genomes.  Any portion of any genome may be retrieved at any scale, together with dozens of aligned annotation tracks (known genes, predicted genes, ESTs, mRNAs, CpG islands, assembly gaps and overage, chromosomal bands, mouse homologies, and more).  Users can also add their own custom tracks to the browser for educational or research purposes.  In addition, the Browser provides portals to ENCODE data, the Neanderthal sequences, and is home to the popular sequence alignment tool, BLAT.

 

Instructor: Dr. Diane Rein

Location: TBD – South Campus

Date: Friday, July 25, 2014

Time: 1pm-4pm

Registration: http://ubtlc.buffalo.edu/workshops/workshop.asp?EventID=2015

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Pharm GKB - A pharmacogenomics knowledge resource that encompasses clinical information (including dosing guidelines and drug labels), potential clinically actionable gene-drug association, and genotype-phenotype relationships.  PharmGKB collects, curates and disseminates knowledge about the impact of human genetic variation on drug responses.

 

Instructor: Dr. Diane Rein

Location: TBD   – South Campus

Date: Friday, August 15, 2014

Time 1:00 PM – 3:00 PM

Registration: http://ubtlc.buffalo.edu/workshops/workshop.asp?EventID=2016
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Wikipedia vs Peer-Reviewed Literature

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Yesterday, I was reading New York Magazine when I came across an article titled “Don’t Trust Dr. Wikipedia.” Needless to say, it caught my attention. The article highlights the findings of a May 2014 article published in The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association. According to the authors, who compared Wikipedia entries concerning the ten most costly conditions (as determined by AHRQ) with peer-reviewed literature, nine of the entries contained errors. A little disconcerting, no?

The article, which is freely available online, cites several sources that suggest that 47-70% of physicians and medical students use Wikipedia as a reference. The authors also assert that this estimate may be low. Despite a handful of limitations, including ignoring errors of omission and not verifying peer-reviewed sources, the study brings the issue of using Wikipedia in patient care back into the light.

I wanted to read a little more about this, so I scanned the reference list. One of the references was a 2009 article from the International Journal of Medical Informatics called “Junior Physician’s Use of Web 2.0 for Information Seeking and Medical Education: A Qualitative Study.” This study evaluated the habits of 35 recent medical school graduates in London. Participants completed diary entries detailing their use of internet sources and were later interviewed to gather additional information.

A whopping 89% of the participants used at least one Web 2.0 tool in their practice; Google and Wikipedia were heavily consulted. The type of question, open or closed, often dictated which source they chose to consult. Web 2.0 tools were popular sources for open, or background questions, whereas more traditional best evidence tools were used to answer in depth, patient specific questions.

Where do you fall on the spectrum? Are you using tools available through the library like Cochrane, PubMed, or UpToDate, or do you head straight to Google or Wikipedia? Did you know that Cochrane has a “Wikipedian in Residence?”

 

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Canine invasion!

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Translation: Dogs in the Health Sciences Library! Need I say more?

When: Next week, Tuesday, May 13th – Thursday, May 15th, from 11 a.m. – 3 p.m.

Where: Room B-15, lower level

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Congratulations, Class of 2014!

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Today’s a day that has been at least four years in the making! Congratulations on your graduation from medical school and best of luck in your future endeavors.

Taking the oath

Newly minted MDs taking the oath in 2011.

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USMLE Step 1 Exam Prep Materials

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This post goes out to the second year medical students cramming for the USMLE Step 1 exam. If you are wondering if the UB Libraries have any test prep materials, here’s a list of items that you might find beneficial. Links are to catalog records for each book. Click on “ClinicalKey” to get to the book.

Good luck!

USMLE Electronic Books 

Additional Review Books

 USMLE Print Books

  • USMLE Step 1 miniqbook. Manley and Manley, Eds. Kaplan Medical. 2009. Health Sciences Library Reserve  – 1st floor
  • First Aid Q & A for the USMLE Step 1. T. Le, S.K. Bechis, and K.A. Adler, Eds. McGraw-Hill Medical. 2nd ed., 2009. Health Sciences Library Reserve  – 1st floor
  • First aid for the USMLE step 1 2014 : a student-to-student guide, in First aid series. T. Le and V. Bhushan. McGraw-Hill Medical. 2014. Call Number: W 18.2 L433f 2014, 3rd floor stacks (currently checked out)
  • First aid for the USMLE step 1 2010. T. Le and V. Bhushan. McGraw-Hill Medical. 2010. Health Sciences Library Reserve  – 1st floor
  • First aid for the USMLE step 1 2009. T. Le. McGraw-Hill Medical. Health Sciences Library Reserve  – 1st floor
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New EndNote Video Tutorials

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Did you know that you can download references from PubMed into your EndNote library? That means that citation information from PubMed will automatically be added to your library! This typically includes the abstract, too, if it is available. Think of all the time you’ll save.

Have you configured your Google Scholar settings to work with EndNote? Yep, it’s true, you can also download references from Google Scholar.

If you answered no to either question and you want to learn more, check out our Health Sciences Library playlist on the UB Libraries YouTube channel.

Feel free to contact me directly or visit the EndNote website at endnote.com if you have any questions!

 

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EndNote class Friday 3/28!

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The last EndNote class of the Spring semester on the South Campus is scheduled for Friday (3/28) from 10-11:30 in the Health Sciences Library! Don’t miss your chance to learn how to use this powerful tool.

Q: What is EndNote?

A: It is a reference management program that you can download for free with your UBIT name and password. Input your own references or download references from databases like PubMed, Medline, and Web of Science. Search for full text articles or add PDFs to your EndNote “library.” EndNote works with Microsoft Word so that you can “Cite While You Write.” There are hundreds of styles to choose from depending on your project.

Register here!

 

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Gaming to Advance Medicine

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Earlier this month, Medscape highlighted a smartphone game called “Play to Cure: Genes in Space” that is being used to help cure cancer. Each time a player navigates his or her space shuttle while collecting “Element Alpha,” genetic variations are being explored and analyzed. Patterns may reveal mutations in tumor biology that cause cancer to grow and spread. Determining which genes are cancer drivers will enable scientists to tailor treatment strategies and pinpoint the root of this disease. The game is one of two developed by Cancer Research UK.

This isn’t the first time that scientists have tapped gamers for their expertise. In a matter of weeks in 2011, online gamers were able to figure out the structure of a retroviral protease by playing “Foldit.” Retroviral protease is a protein involved in HIV replication. Foldit was created by a team based at the University of Washington.

Sources:

Citizens Seek Cancer Cure With ‘Genes in Space’ Smartphone Game.  Medscape. Feb 04, 2014., TIME, CNET, University of WashingtonWired UK

Related Articles in PubMed:

Loguercio, S., B.M. Good, and A.I. Su, Dizeez: an online game for human gene-disease annotation. PLoS One, 2013. 8(8): p. e71171.

Kwak, D., et al., Open-Phylo: a customizable crowd-computing platform for multiple sequence alignment. Genome Biol, 2013. 14(10): p. R116.

Cooper, S., F. Khatib, and D. Baker, Increasing public involvement in structural biology. Structure, 2013. 21(9): p. 1482-4.

Eiben, C.B., et al., Increased Diels-Alderase activity through backbone remodeling guided by Foldit players. Nat Biotechnol, 2012. 30(2): p. 190-2.

Khatib, F., et al., Crystal structure of a monomeric retroviral protease solved by protein folding game players. Nat Struct Mol Biol, 2011. 18(10): p. 1175-7.

Khatib, F., et al., Algorithm discovery by protein folding game players. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A, 2011. 108(47): p. 18949-53.

Cooper, S., et al., Predicting protein structures with a multiplayer online game. Nature, 2010. 466(7307): p. 756-60.

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Top Resources

MEDLINE

As the preeminent database in medicine, MEDLINE is the best place to start when searching for biomedical literature.  More Info
UB ONLY
Partial Full-Text

Evidence Based Medicine Reviews (EBMR)

Provides full-text article and topic reviews. EBMR is a great source for evidence based medicine researchers. Search across seven resources including the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, ACP Journal Club, and Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects.  More Info
UB ONLY
Full-Text

UpToDate

Designed to provide practical, concise information needed at the point of care, UpToDate provides evidence-based answers to commonly asked questions in clinical practice. Remote access not available for UpToDate.
UB ONLY

ClinicalKey

A search engine and database of peer-reviewed and evidence-based clinical information resources designed to support physician patient care decisions. Includes journals, books, guidelines, multimedia, and drug information. A component of ClinicalKey, First Consult, serves as a point-of-care clinical reference tool.  More Info
UB ONLY

Web of Science Core Collection

Multidisciplinary database to journal literature in the sciences that indexes several top tier medical journals.  More Info
UB ONLY
Partial Full-Text

Harrison's Principles of Internal Medicine

The complete contents of Harrison's Principles of internal medicine, 18th edition.  More Info
UB ONLY

Databases

AccessMedicine

A database resource that provides students, residents, clinicians, researchers and other health professionals with access to the full text of the current editions of nearly 70 medical textbook and reference titles with updated content and thousands of images and illustrations  More Info
UB ONLY
Partial Full-Text

Allied & Complementary Medicine (AMED)

This resource searches a selection of journals in complementary or "alternative" medicine, palliative care, and several professions allied to medicine.  More Info
UB ONLY
Partial Full-Text

CINAHL Plus with Full Text

Provides comprehensive coverage of journal literature in the nursing and allied health care fields. Complements MEDLINE.  More Info
UB ONLY
Partial Full-Text

EMBASE via Elsevier

Covers the effects, use, and administration of all current, potential and experimental drugs, side effects, manufacturers, and trade names of approved and prospective drugs.  More Info
UB ONLY
Partial Full-Text

Health and Psychosocial Instruments (HaPI)

Provides access to information on evaluation and measurement tools used in the health sciences.  More Info
UB ONLY
Partial Full-Text

Journals@Ovid Full Text

A collection of full-text journals in the medical and health-related fields.  More Info
UB ONLY
Partial Full-Text

Lexi-Comp Online (HUBNET)

Contains up-to-date drug information, dosage information, natural product information and drug toxicology information. Remote access not available for Lexi-Comp Online.
UB ONLY
Partial Full-Text

National Guideline Clearinghouse (NGC)

Clearinghouse (NGC). Evidence-based clinical practice guidelines and related documents. Includes links to some full-text documents.  More Info
UB ONLY
Partial Full-Text

PsycINFO

References plus abstracts (and selected full text) to journal articles, books, book chapters, and dissertations in psychology for the years 1806-present.  More Info
UB ONLY
Partial Full-Text

ScienceDirect - (Elsevier)

An e-journal collection that contains partial full text access to scientific, technical and medical literature.  More Info
UB ONLY
Partial Full-Text

Encyclopedias

PUBLIC
Full-Text

HUBNET Resources - Electronic Books

Provides access to several full-text medical references and textbooks.
UB ONLY

Merck Manual

An excellent online medical textbook. More Info
PUBLIC
Full-Text