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Health Sciences Library
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Dentistry



Recap of Dr. McCall’s class

Thank you for your attention during yesterday’s class! Here’s a recap of everything we went over:

PubMed

  • Provided by the National Library of Medicine, PubMed contains over 24 million citations to literature in the medical and biomedical sciences fields.
  • ALWAYS access PubMed through the library’s site so you can have UB’s full text access.
  • Most article are indexed with MeSH (Medical Subject Headings), which can be summed up as terms that are best to use to locate the information you need.  It’s the preferred language of the database.
  • You can build searches with MeSH (including subheadings) from the MeSH database, or by changing the drop down menu next to the search box to MeSH.
  • The advanced search option in PubMed will save the last 8 hours of your searches, and will allow you to build complex searches by combining multiple terms at once.
  • Limits or filters for your search results will appear on the left side of your screen; good ones to remember are article type, publication dates, and age range of subjects.
  • Remember to check the MeSH terms assigned to articles you find useful, as they might be useful for your own search.
  • Always look for the Article Linker button in the upper right corner of the screen – this will connect you to the full text!  If we don’t have the full tex available, make a request through Delivery+ and the libraries will ge tit for you for free.
  • If you create a free My NCBI account with PubMed, you can save searches and set up search alerts, set up custom filters, and edit preferences of how your results appear.

Remember, a good way to find original research is find a systematic review on your topic, and take a look at the articles the systematic review is summarizing.  Systematic reviews usually only synthesize randomized controlled trials, cohort studies, or case control studies, which are high level evidence original research articles.  Use the systematic review limit under article type to quickly limit your results to only systematic reviews!  You can also search for different study designs by using the type of study as a MeSH term; cohort studies and case-control studies do not have article type limits for them, but using the MeSH term will work.

Also, when critiquing a randomized control trial, take a look at the CONSORT Statement.  Other useful tools for analyzing the evidence can be found on the ADA’s evidence-based dentistry site.

Remember, if you have any questions or if you get stuck in your research, you can always contact me.  Thanks, and good luck with your searching!

Let EndNote be your best friend.

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Here at the UB Libraries, we offer plenty of FREE workshops for information tools that are guaranteed to make your life easier. Our most popular workshop by far is our No Experience EndNote class, where in approximately an hour you will learn all of the basics of EndNote.

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These people love EndNote. This could be you!

Not sure what EndNote is? EndNote is a citation management program that will not only help you keep your research organized, but will create citations in your paper for you in any style with the click of a button. Any. Style. EndNote will manage all of your citations, including the bibliography, for you, saving you tons of time. It’s pretty fabulous. Those of you who are currently in the process of writing research papers or getting ready to submit an article to a journal, I highly recommend you get familiar with the program, and let it save you from a lot of time and frustration trying to format your bibliography.  You can download EndNote from the UB Libraries for free to get started.

Now that I’ve convinced you how EndNote can change your life, you can sign up for one of our workshops here. We also offer an advanced EndNote class for those of you that want to up your game and become EndNote gurus. If the class dates and times don’t work for you, just contact me and we’ll make sure you get the info you need. EndNote also has a great YouTube channel with quick tutorials if you need something fast. Any questions, just let me know!

Recap of Dr. Brown’s class

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Here’s a recap of what I went over in Dr. Brown’s class on Monday, August 18th:

PubMed

  • provided by the National Library of Medicine, PubMed contains thousands of citations from medical journals in the fields of dentistry, medicine, nursing, and pre-clinical sciences.
  • it is possible to search using natural language or MeSH (medical subject headings); to use MeSH to search, switch from PubMed to MeSH in the drop-down menu from the main search box or use the MeSH database.
  • MeSH is the common language of PubMed; when looking at an article, always check what MeSH terms have been assigned to it for ideas about your own search.  It’s also a great place to go for term definitions!
  • Use the filters on the left side of the page to quickly narrow your search by article type, publication years, age of subjects, and more. Remember to clear the filters after your search, or they will be applied to every search you do until you take them off.
  • to access the full text of an article, always select the Article Linker button, which will appear in the upper right corner of the site when reviewing the detailed record of an article citation.
  • most importantly, always access PubMed through HSL’s site. PubMed will know you are affiliated with UB and will connect you to the UB Libraries’ subscriptions, allowing you to get the full text that you need.

Web of Science

  • Web of Science is a huge databases which indexes the sciences, social sciences, and humanities. It does not use controlled vocabulary like MeSH.
  • Web of Science can be used in two ways to find information: general literature searching, or cited reference searching. Cited reference searching will allow you to see what article have cited a specific article since publication, as well as allow you to view the references of the specific article as well. If one article cites another, odds are they are on a very similar topic.
  • Remember to pay attention to your drop down menus!
  • High citation counts usually indicate that an article is a landmark article, and contains important information for its field.
  • Remember to use the article linker to find the full text of articles!

Google hacks

  • putting search terms in quotes will filter through results to return items where the words appear together.  Example: “heart attack”
  • use the minus symbol to take out results that do not apply to your search. Example: sand sharks -movie
  • to limit to a site type, use site:. Example – site:.gov will limit results to only government websites.  Note: one of you asked if you could limit to more than one site type at a time; it looks like that at this time, it is not possible, and you will have to run separate site domain searches.  I’m sorry I don’t have better news!

Google Scholar and UB Libraries full text

go into Google Scholar settings -> library links -> University at Buffalo. Check the check box next to University at Buffalo, and select save. Next time you search, you should see a “Find it @UB” link next to each citation, which will search through the UB Libraries’ subscriptions to find you the full text of what you need.  If the “Find it @ UB” link is missing, remember to select “More” under the citation, which should then make a link for “Check Library Holdings” appear.  This link is the same as “Find it @ UB”.

Good luck with the rest of the semester!  Remember, if you have any questions, feel free to contact me.

Welcome, Dental Students!

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Welcome first year dental students! It was great seeing all of you today during orientation. As promised, here is where you can view the presentation I gave earlier today.

I hope you enjoy your time here!  Remember, if you ever need any research assistance, I’m always here to help.  Send me an email, give me a call, stop by the library, or come see me in the dental clinics on Thursday mornings in Dr. Gambacorta’s section.  Good luck!

Recap of Dental Student Summer Research class on 7/8/14

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As promised, here is a recap of the information we went over today in Dr. Edgerton’s class.

PubMed

  • provided by the National Library of Medicine, PubMed contains thousands of citations from medical journals in the fields of dentistry, medicine, nursing, and pre-clinical sciences.
  • it is possible to search using natural language or MeSH (medical subject headings); to use MeSH to search, switch from PubMed to MeSH in the dropdown menu from the main search box.
  • MeSH is the common language of PubMed; when looking at an article, always check what MeSH terms have been assigned to it for ideas about your own search.
  • the advanced search will allow you build complicated searches, and will display all of your searches from the last eight hours.
  • Use the filters on the left side of the page to quickly narrow your search by article type, publication years, age of subjects, and more.  One thing to remember about limits – clear the filters after your search, or they will be applied to every search you do until you take them off.
  • if you create a MY NCBI account, you can set up search alerts, save citations to a favorites list, create custom filters, and review any search you have ever done in PubMed
  • to access the full text of an article, always select the Article Linker button, which will appear in the upper right corner of the site when reviewing the detailed record of an article citation.
  • most importantly, always access PubMed through HSL’s site.  PubMed will know you are affiliated with UB and will connect you to the UB Libraries’ subscriptions, allowing you to get the full text that you need.

Web of Science

  • Web of Science is a huge databases which indexes the sciences, social sciences, and humanities.  It does not use controlled vocabulary like MeSH.
  • Web of Science can be used in two ways to find information: general literature searching, or cited reference searching.  Cited reference searching will allow you to see what article have cited a specific article since publication, as well as allow you to view the references of the specific article as well.  If one article cites another, odds are they are on a very similar topic.
  • High citation counts usually indicate that an article is a landmark article, and contains important information for its field.

Google hacks

  • putting search terms in quotes will filter through results to return items where the words appear together.
  • use the minus symbol to take out results that do not apply to your search.  Example: sand sharks -movie
  • to limit to a site type, use site:.  Example – site:.gov will limit results to only government websites.

Google Scholar and UB Libraries full text

  • go into Google Scholar settings -> library links -> University at Buffalo.  Check the check box next to University at Buffalo, and select save.  Next time you search, you should see a “Find it @UB” link next to each citation, which will search through the UB Libraries’ subscriptions to find you the full text of what you need.

 

If you would like to see the plagiarism presentation that I gave today, you can see it here.  And remember, if you ever have any questions, please feel free to contact me and ask away!

Top Resources

MEDLINE

The best place to find biomedical literature including extensive indexing of dentistry journals. MEDLINE includes information from the Index to Dental Literature.  More Info
UB ONLY
Partial Full-Text

Web of Science Core Collection

Multidisciplinary database to journal literature in the sciences that indexes several top tier dentistry journals, including the Journal of Dental Research.  More Info
UB ONLY
Partial Full-Text

CINAHL Plus with Full Text

Provides comprehensive coverage of nursing, dental education, dental hygiene and other allied dental health journal literature.  More Info
UB ONLY
Partial Full-Text

ScienceDirect - (Elsevier)

An e-journal collection that contains partial full-text access to scientific, technical and medical literature, including journals in dentistry.  More Info
UB ONLY
Full-Text

Evidence Based Medicine Reviews (EBMR)

Provides full-text article and topic reviews. EBMR is an excellent source for evidence-based dentistry researchers.  More Info
UB ONLY
Full-Text

PubMed

Povides free of charge access to all MEDLINE citations  More Info
PUBLIC

Databases

EMBASE via Elsevier

Covers the effects, use, and administration of all current, potential and experimental drugs, side effects, manufacturers, and trade names of approved and prospective drugs.  More Info
UB ONLY
Partial Full-Text

Lexi-Comp Online (HUBNET)

Contains up-to-date drug information, dosage information, natural product information and drug toxicology information.
UB ONLY
Partial Full-Text

National Guideline Clearinghouse (NGC)

Evidence-based clinical practice guidelines and related documents. Includes links to some full-text documents.  More Info
UB ONLY
Partial Full-Text

Encyclopedias

American Dental Association Directory

The ADA Directory provides basic information on individual dentists in the United States. More Info
PUBLIC

HUBNET Resources - Electronic Books

A compliation of full text medical references and textbooks.
UB ONLY

Merck Manual

An excellent online medical textbook which contains several chapters on dental and oral disorders. More Info
PUBLIC
Full-Text