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Archive for the ‘Scholarly Publishing’ Category

Festschrift in Honor of Eli Ruckenstein, Distinguished Professor, Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering

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untitledThe June 2017 issue of Advances in Colloid and Interface Science is a festschrift in honor of Distinguished Professor Eli Ruckenstein, hailed as “A Rare Researcher, Teacher, and Mentor par Excellence” by the guest editors of the special issue.

From their dedicatory article:

Researchers cannot miss the name of Ruckenstein when they are looking in the literature for key insights and research directions in numerous and diverse areas including heat and mass transfer in laminar and turbulent flows, separation processes, catalysis, colloids and emulsions, molecular assembly phenomena, polymer membranes, superconducting materials, immobilized enzymes, nucleation, stability of thin films and foams, design of antifouling surfaces, thrombus growth, etc. They naturally wonder whether there are many researchers named Ruckenstein since the research areas are highly specialized and most researchers usually are confined to working in just a few closely related problem areas. Their suspicion of multiple Ruckensteins is reinforced by the prolific number of publications they find on each topic. When they finally learn that there is only one Eli Ruckenstein, the overwhelming thought that strikes one is how a single individual could have worked on such multiplicity of topics, and contributed significantly and in such depth to so many diverging themes of modern chemical engineering.

Ruckenstein is one of the world’s most influential chemical engineers. He has made ground-breaking contributions in many areas and published more than 1000 scientific papers. He was the first chemical engineer to receive the National Medal of Science, considered the U.S. equivalent of the Nobel Prize. To think of Eli Ruckenstein as an outstanding researcher, a dedicated teacher, and an inspiring mentor of many academic and industrial chemical engineers captures only a partial image of his persona. Indeed, he is among the select few in the community of international chemical engineering and in the history of our profession.

It is our pleasure and privilege to dedicate this festschrift issue of Advances in Colloid and Interface Science to Eli as he just marked his 91st birthday.

Web of Science Now Back to 1945

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indexThe UB Libraries have been able to expand its coverage in the Web of Science database to include all post-World War II science and technology. This was made possible with one-time, end-of-the-fiscal-year funds allowing us to purchase  a 20-year back file that now pushes our coverage back to 1945. This acquisition will increase citation metrics for researchers with a long publication history. In addition, many classic sci/tech articles will now be discoverable, such as the work of Nobel Prize laureate William Shockley, co-inventor of the transistor; see, for example:

THE THEORY OF P-N JUNCTIONS IN SEMICONDUCTORS AND P-N JUNCTION TRANSISTORS
By: SHOCKLEY, W
BELL SYSTEM TECHNICAL JOURNAL Volume: 28 Issue: 3 Pages: 435-489 Published: 1949
Times Cited: 1,203

Open Access Publishing Options: American Chemical Society (ACS)

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Although known for its high quality subscription journals, the American Chemical Society (ACS) offers a number of open access (free-to-read) publishing options for its authors.

But first, why should researchers care about open access?

  • Many studies show that open access articles are downloaded twice as much and on average cited 8-50% more than equivalent articles locked behind subscription “pay-walls.” This can translate to higher citation metrics for tenure and promotion.
  • A U.S. Law passed in January 2014 mandates that virtually all federally funded research articles be openly available within 12 months of publication.
  • The social good of reaching (and the extra readership by) scholars and educators associated with smaller institutions and those in poorer countries that cannot afford expensive journal subscriptions should not be underestimated.

Although it is true that federally funded research articles must now have a free-to-read version available after 12 months, there are advantages to eliminating that embargo period via immediate open access including getting timelier, enhanced worldwide exposure for your research accomplishments.

ACS provides four main avenues for open access publication:

1)      The new ACS Central Science, a highly selective, peer-reviewed journal that is fully open access with no embargo.

2)      ACS Author Choice permits authors to pay a one-time article processing charge (APC) to make their article openly available upon publication.

3)      ACS Author Rewards, a fairly new program whereby the corresponding author of every ACS peer-reviewed article receives a credit of $1,500 that can be used in the subsequent year to pay the APC for any newly submitted or make any previously published subscription article open access.

4)      ACS Editors’ Choice, a composite on-line journal created by ACS editors picking one article to be made permanently open access each day of the year from across all ACS journals.

Details of these programs as of April 2, 2015 were published in a Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters viewpoint article, “ACS is Open”. However, the parameters of these programs may change in the future so scholars are encouraged to visit the ACS Author & Reviewer Resource Center for the most up-to-date information.

In addition, all publishers, including the American Chemical Society, must allow authors to comply with the new funding agency open access policies rapidly being implemented over the next few years.

Massive, New E-Book Collection – ebrary Academic Complete

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We are pleased to announce that the UB Libraries now subscribe to ebrary Academic Complete, a dynamic collection of over 120,000 e-books across a wide variety of academic disciplines. About one quarter of them are sci/tech/medical titles. Included are hundreds of titles from publishers such as the National Academies Press, Wiley, Oxford, MIT Press, World Scientific, IOS Press, and Cambridge University Press.

There are four very important points regarding this resource:

1)     These titles will NOT appear in our library catalog since titles will move in and out of this subscription service. We will not have access rights to any of these books beyond our three-year contract.

2)     These titles can be searched via the default “Everything” search box on the library home page or as a separate database.

3)     Ebrary Academic Complete is a cost-effective approach to providing access to many more e-books than we could ever afford to purchase outright.

4)     Downloading and printing restrictions are listed clearly on the details page of every e-book.  Most e-books allow for unlimited simultaneous use and as such are appropriate for use in courses.

Open Access Publishing – Major Worldwide Study

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The European Commission recently released the most comprehensive study of open access (OA) publishing in peer reviewed journals ever done, an analysis of over 1 million articles indexed in Scopus from 1996-2013.  Open access articles are free for anyone to read. This massive study is filled with data that includes the growth of OA, the proportion of various types of OA articles, the availability of OA articles by discipline, and the citation advantage OA papers have over articles requiring a subscription to read.  It is the only study to our knowledge that includes a breakdown of OA articles by country, region, discipline, publication year, and type of OA (Gold: published directly in an OA journal; Green: made freely available by the author via an official institutional or disciplinary repository; Other: Freely available on the Internet via some other means).

A few of the main findings are:

1) More than 50% of articles published between 2007-2012 are freely available as of April 2014.

2) OA articles overall are cited 40.3% more than non-OA articles, ranging from 26% to 64% based on discipline.

3) The proportion of Gold OA articles (published directly in OA journals) is currently doubling every 4.1 years.

At a minimum, the 7-page executive summary is worth a careful read.  See: Archambault, E., Amyot, D., Deschamps, P., Nicol, A., Provencher, F., Rebout, L., & Roberge, G. (2014). Proportion of Open Access Papers Published in Peer-Reviewed Journals at the European and World Levels: 1996-2013 (D 1.8 version 11p ed., pp. ix, 41): Science-Metrix.

 

Older papers are increasingly remembered—and cited

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Recently a study done by Google Inc. researchers indicates that older papers are increasingly being found and cited by researchers. The November 4, 2014 paper is freely available at arXiv.org and is entitled On the Shoulders of Giants: The Growing Impact of Older Articles. John Bohannon wrote an interesting Science magazine news report about the study that same day. He notes that the Google researchers used Google Scholar data and “analyzed scientific papers published between 1990 and 2013. They divided the papers into nine broad research areas and 261 subject categories. Then they compared the publication dates of the papers cited in all those papers.”

The study authors hypothesize this may be the effective of mass digitization and the increasing cumulative body of born-digital scholarship.  In the news report, a commentator offers a different hypothesis, that the growth of the scientific literature is slowing, but offers no evidence for that surprising statement (at least to us librarians who see the growth of open access journals and prices/page counts for subscription journals).  A darker hypothesis is that the average quality of papers is decreasing requiring scholars to look further back in time for citable material. However, this last hypothesis is predicated on scholars being particularly diligent in citing only high quality research.

“Web of Science Day” Re-Cap

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Web of Science Training in the SEIC

Yesterday’s Web of Science Day was a great success, with UB students and faculty in attendance for three sessions on how to effectively search the Web of Science databases for information and citation data.

Some of the things that UB students and faculty learned in the Science & Engineering Information Center yesterday:

  • How to use Boolean logic to construct effective keyword searches.
  • How to create a citation report for individual authors, departments, schools, or sets of reference; these reports include automatically generated graphs and calculate basic statistics about articles in the set, including h-index and average citations per item.
  • How to set it up saved searches which will automatically run against the Web of Science databases on a schedule you set (weekly, bi-weekly, monthly), with the search results e-mailed to you.
  • How to use Web of Science with EndNote to download citations into your own EndNote database to sort, search, annotate, and cite.
  • How to find recent patents as well as data sets.
  • What a journal impact factor is, and how you can use it to decide where to publish.

UB BioMed Central Membership

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Thanks to funding provided by our Health Sciences Library colleagues, effective October 2, UB is now is a member of one of the best and largest open access publishers, BioMed Central (BMC).

This membership gives UB authors a 15% discount on the article processing charges with no limit on number of articles per year. If you go to our UB member page, you will see how active UB is on BioMed Central. UB researchers had five articles published in BMC journals last month. BMC’s extensive journal list of over 100 titles has considerable breadth including biochemistry, structural biology and ecology titles, for example.
When you submit your research to any of our journals, it will receive rigorous and rapid peer review. If your article is accepted:

  • It will be accessible to anyone with an Internet connection – open access means no subscriptions or ‘pay-per-view’ charges for original research articles.
  • It is more likely to be cited, as it will be freely available to the entire global biological and medical community
  • It will be listed in PubMed within days of publication and also archived in PubMed Central.
  • You retain the copyright of your work
  • You will be able to view your article’s access statistics, which average over 200 downloads per month per article

Please consider publishing in a BMC journal. By submitting your manuscript from a UB location, you should automatically receive a 15% discount on article processing charges. See more information about the benefits of publishing with BioMed Central.

UB Authors Publish for Free: Electrochemical Society Journals

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The Electrochemical Society (ECS) has just announced that since the UB Libraries support a subscription to their journals, UB authors can publish their articles with the benefits of immediate open access at no charge for the rest of 2014. The open access article processing charge of $800 is completely waived. The full announcement is at: http://www.electrochem.org/oa/#apc.

Open access publishing enhances visibility, readership, and getting cited. This is becoming more and more crucial as citation metrics play an increasing role in the evaluation of scholarship (for better or worse). There is also the satisfaction of knowing that scholars in even the poorest countries in the world can access your research without subscription barriers.

Please contact a faculty librarian in the Science and Engineering Information Center if you have any questions about copyright, reserving rights to your work, open access publishing options, reputation of journals (especially when you receive unsolicited offers from an unfamiliar journal), publisher agreements, and article processing charges.

Impressions: Charleston Conference 2013

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by A. Ben Wagner, Sciences Librarian

The Charleston Conference focuses on electronic resources and collection issues such as open access, MOOC’s, altmetrics, citation metrics and management,  and copyright. Many of the presentations are freely available by going to the online program, hovering one’s mouse over the session title until the abstract pop-up window appears and then clicking on the “Slides” button, or in cases of multiple files, embedded links within the abstract text. There are some extraordinary presentations, and most of the slides clearly convey much of the content. http://2013charlestonconference.sched.org/

My impressions:

A)     Open Access is developing an air of inevitability what with the Federal funding agencies having submitted open article and open data proposals now under internal (confidential) review per the February 2013 White House directive and the major announcement by the American Chemical Society of 4 new/enhanced open access programs including a brand new open access (OA) journal, ACS Central Science.

B)      I was disappointed that there is no timetable for finishing the review of federal funding agencies OA proposals to provide open access.  Nor is there any guarantee or indication of what, if any, public review will eventually take place.

C)      There is a lively, continuing debate over if libraries should maintain a fund to pay article processing charges (APC’s) for open access publication. And if they do, what conditions should be place on it such as a cap on the fee, embargo period, and publications funded per author per year. One interesting criteria was a requirement that the item be deposited in the institutional repository. Much of the debate focuses on sustainability, given library budgets, and good will/tangible support for OA vs. administrative headaches. Fundamental issues include:

  1. Library forced into supporting two systems (subscriptions & APC’s).
  2. Will this just be the same publishers making more money?
  3. Are we biasing authors towards the minority of OA journals that charge APC’s vs. the majority that do not?
  4. Researchers are not taking ownership of the costs of dissemination so have we really changed the system. How can we encourage decisions based on price and bring competitive forces into play?

D)     Lots of talk about article level metrics (so-called altmetrics). More and more publishers and database vendors are setting up licenses with altmetrics firms such as ImpactStory, Plum Analytics, and Altmetric.com. Public Library of Science, Highwire Press, and the American Institute of Physics are just three of a rapidly increasing number of publishers now showing article-level metrics of some type, even if it is only downloads and reads.

E)      No surprise that MOOC’s (massive open online courses) were discussed.  Some observations that were made:

  1. The only reason our reference services work is that so few of our patrons take advantage of them. Scale is an old problem, but MOOC’s could instantly overwhelm our services.
  2. Obvious problems with copyright/use of materials. Although permissions are sometimes possible, MOOC content understandably gravitates towards public domain/Creative Commons licensing material.  This is especially true when students may come from scores of countries with varying copyright and fair use laws, or having no fair use recognized at all.
  3. MOOC’s will destroy traditional textbooks before they destroy higher education (the “college experience” is a value-added dimension not easily replicated).
  4. Educators and librarians who are supporters of open access publishing whereby publishers are threatened, suddenly have a different attitude when it comes to MOOC’s which threaten higher ed and libraries.  What’s good for the goose is good for the gander?
  5. WARNING: Most MOOC platforms treat you (the library/scholar) as publisher requiring you to warrant compliance with all intellectual property/copyright law.
  6. A tricky and uncertain legal situation where institution is non-profit and course/platform is for profit.  Be careful.

F)      Fair use strengthened and reaffirmed by recent court cases. There have been some “nuisance” or really picky cases, e.g. use of 9 words in a film, correctly attributed to Faulkner where overzealous copyright holders have been roundly defeated. Often victorious on the grounds of transformative use; this is becoming a key legal argument.

G)     A real concern among librarians and publishers that a somewhat recent change in Google Scholar ranking algorithms penalized journal articles behind pay walls. A few studies have indicated that this has a variable, but at times significant effect. JSTOR in particular suffered a significant drop in traffic from Google Scholar.

H)     Libraries are seeing a real mix of citation management tools in use on their campus and are trying to figure out how many and how to support all the tools patrons are interested in.  Some universities have developed detailed, yet summary, comparison charts such as Univ. of Wisconsin-Madison, University of Washington, and Penn State. We should either link to these or develop our own.  One presentation indicated:

  1. Individual work – RefWorks, EndNote, Papers
  2. Collaborative Work – Zotero & Mendeley
  3. Multi-language – RefWorks, Zotero
  4. Compatibility with BibTex – Mendeley
  5. Multiple OS – Mendeley

I)        Study of ILL requests after large journal cancellation projects at 3 North Carolina universities showed minimal impact on ILL operations with only 1%-4% of the requests in the subsequent year being from the cancelled journals.

J)       Fifteen new resources/innovations were highlighted in 5-minute presentations in a plenary product showcase:

  1. ACSESS DL – a digital library back to 1908 created by an alliance of three crop, soil, and environmental societies.
  2. ISNI – International Standard Name Identifier – real progress on a standard universal number for authors/scholars. ORCID will be a subset of the ISNI database.  This is operational (6.4 million individuals & 400,000 organizations), and they are doing retrospective assignments.
  3. Docuseek2 – streams social issue and documentary film videos.
  4. Elsevier Reference Modules – bundles reference works, book chapters, and articles by discipline using the ScienceDirect platform.
  5. Dictionary of American Regional English Digital (Harvard Univ. Press) – e-version greatly enriched with sound recordings, map interface, etc.
  6. AccessScience – McGraw Hill (not sure why this long-time product made the list)
  7. Proquest Research Companion – similar to our Research Tips web site, i.e. how to write a paper.
  8. ArtStor Shared Shelf – organizations can now catalog, upload, manage, and share loca media collections. Neat!
  9. SIPX – outsourced end-to-end solution for copyright and IP management for learning management systems and MOOCs.
  10. SPIE Open Access Program – 1/3 of authors now choose open access option at $100 per page.
  11. New Taylor & Francis Library/Info Science Journal Open Access Policy – full green OA, deposit in IR and use in LMS permitted, 50 tokens for free access that can be given out to anyone.
  12. ASM Science (American Soc. of Micobiology) – new digital library platform, books free of digital rights management restrictions.
  13. Thieme e-clinical platforms (Thieme eNeurosurgery, Thieme eOtolaryngology, Thieme eSpine) – comprehensive, multimedia platforms pulling together textbooks, books, videos, procedures, journal articles, and PubMed information.
  14. Browzine (Third Iron) – organizes both open access and subscription articles into a unified, composite journal which is placed on a common, library-branded newsstand and easily accessible from a tablet.
  15. Next Gen Web of Science (Thomson Reuters) – new “clean” interface, Google Scholar partnership whereby WOS citations show in Google Scholar results for WOS customers & full-text link to Google Scholar from WOS, more regional content.

K)      Readcube is making some waves in the rental/pay-per-article field.  3 levels of access: rental, cloud purchase, and PDF purchase. Currently 110 journals, but includes Nature Publishing Group, and they say they are growing.