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Archive for the ‘Journals’ Category

Festschrift in Honor of Eli Ruckenstein, Distinguished Professor, Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering

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untitledThe June 2017 issue of Advances in Colloid and Interface Science is a festschrift in honor of Distinguished Professor Eli Ruckenstein, hailed as “A Rare Researcher, Teacher, and Mentor par Excellence” by the guest editors of the special issue.

From their dedicatory article:

Researchers cannot miss the name of Ruckenstein when they are looking in the literature for key insights and research directions in numerous and diverse areas including heat and mass transfer in laminar and turbulent flows, separation processes, catalysis, colloids and emulsions, molecular assembly phenomena, polymer membranes, superconducting materials, immobilized enzymes, nucleation, stability of thin films and foams, design of antifouling surfaces, thrombus growth, etc. They naturally wonder whether there are many researchers named Ruckenstein since the research areas are highly specialized and most researchers usually are confined to working in just a few closely related problem areas. Their suspicion of multiple Ruckensteins is reinforced by the prolific number of publications they find on each topic. When they finally learn that there is only one Eli Ruckenstein, the overwhelming thought that strikes one is how a single individual could have worked on such multiplicity of topics, and contributed significantly and in such depth to so many diverging themes of modern chemical engineering.

Ruckenstein is one of the world’s most influential chemical engineers. He has made ground-breaking contributions in many areas and published more than 1000 scientific papers. He was the first chemical engineer to receive the National Medal of Science, considered the U.S. equivalent of the Nobel Prize. To think of Eli Ruckenstein as an outstanding researcher, a dedicated teacher, and an inspiring mentor of many academic and industrial chemical engineers captures only a partial image of his persona. Indeed, he is among the select few in the community of international chemical engineering and in the history of our profession.

It is our pleasure and privilege to dedicate this festschrift issue of Advances in Colloid and Interface Science to Eli as he just marked his 91st birthday.

Web of Science Now Back to 1945

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indexThe UB Libraries have been able to expand its coverage in the Web of Science database to include all post-World War II science and technology. This was made possible with one-time, end-of-the-fiscal-year funds allowing us to purchase  a 20-year back file that now pushes our coverage back to 1945. This acquisition will increase citation metrics for researchers with a long publication history. In addition, many classic sci/tech articles will now be discoverable, such as the work of Nobel Prize laureate William Shockley, co-inventor of the transistor; see, for example:

THE THEORY OF P-N JUNCTIONS IN SEMICONDUCTORS AND P-N JUNCTION TRANSISTORS
By: SHOCKLEY, W
BELL SYSTEM TECHNICAL JOURNAL Volume: 28 Issue: 3 Pages: 435-489 Published: 1949
Times Cited: 1,203

Open Access Publishing Options: American Chemical Society (ACS)

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Although known for its high quality subscription journals, the American Chemical Society (ACS) offers a number of open access (free-to-read) publishing options for its authors.

But first, why should researchers care about open access?

  • Many studies show that open access articles are downloaded twice as much and on average cited 8-50% more than equivalent articles locked behind subscription “pay-walls.” This can translate to higher citation metrics for tenure and promotion.
  • A U.S. Law passed in January 2014 mandates that virtually all federally funded research articles be openly available within 12 months of publication.
  • The social good of reaching (and the extra readership by) scholars and educators associated with smaller institutions and those in poorer countries that cannot afford expensive journal subscriptions should not be underestimated.

Although it is true that federally funded research articles must now have a free-to-read version available after 12 months, there are advantages to eliminating that embargo period via immediate open access including getting timelier, enhanced worldwide exposure for your research accomplishments.

ACS provides four main avenues for open access publication:

1)      The new ACS Central Science, a highly selective, peer-reviewed journal that is fully open access with no embargo.

2)      ACS Author Choice permits authors to pay a one-time article processing charge (APC) to make their article openly available upon publication.

3)      ACS Author Rewards, a fairly new program whereby the corresponding author of every ACS peer-reviewed article receives a credit of $1,500 that can be used in the subsequent year to pay the APC for any newly submitted or make any previously published subscription article open access.

4)      ACS Editors’ Choice, a composite on-line journal created by ACS editors picking one article to be made permanently open access each day of the year from across all ACS journals.

Details of these programs as of April 2, 2015 were published in a Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters viewpoint article, “ACS is Open”. However, the parameters of these programs may change in the future so scholars are encouraged to visit the ACS Author & Reviewer Resource Center for the most up-to-date information.

In addition, all publishers, including the American Chemical Society, must allow authors to comply with the new funding agency open access policies rapidly being implemented over the next few years.

American Chemical Society New Mobile App

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The American Chemical Society (ACS) recently released a mobile app, ACS2Go, for their highly used journal web site. The key feature is that, once a user accesses the journal site on campus, it automatically authenticates the device for use off-campus for 4 months, giving researchers the ability to read any subscription-based content without the need for an additional log-in step. ACS2Go can be accessed at http://pubs.acs.org on a tablet or smartphone.

Other features of ACS2Go include:

  • Compatibility with gestural commands to swipe and advance between articles and issues.
  • Ability to browse, search, and download journal articles.
  • Configurability tailored to the research interests and reading habits of the reader.
  • Share articles and links via email.
  • Compatible with devices running iOS, Android and Blackberry.

ACS2Go complements the previously introduced ACS Mobile app.

Database Snapshot: ACM Digital Library

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The ACM (Association for Computing Machinery) Digital Library provides access to bibliographic information, abstracts, reviews, and selected full-text for articles and papers appearing in ACM publications including journals/transactions, magazines, conference proceedings and newsletters for 1947-present. It also provides access to selected works published by affiliated organizations.

Tips for using ACM Digital Library

Enter your terms in the upper search box. In the results list, full-text is noted with PDF or HTML icons. Refine your search using the left column of refine options. Bibliometric information is given for each item.

Open Access Publishing – Major Worldwide Study

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The European Commission recently released the most comprehensive study of open access (OA) publishing in peer reviewed journals ever done, an analysis of over 1 million articles indexed in Scopus from 1996-2013.  Open access articles are free for anyone to read. This massive study is filled with data that includes the growth of OA, the proportion of various types of OA articles, the availability of OA articles by discipline, and the citation advantage OA papers have over articles requiring a subscription to read.  It is the only study to our knowledge that includes a breakdown of OA articles by country, region, discipline, publication year, and type of OA (Gold: published directly in an OA journal; Green: made freely available by the author via an official institutional or disciplinary repository; Other: Freely available on the Internet via some other means).

A few of the main findings are:

1) More than 50% of articles published between 2007-2012 are freely available as of April 2014.

2) OA articles overall are cited 40.3% more than non-OA articles, ranging from 26% to 64% based on discipline.

3) The proportion of Gold OA articles (published directly in OA journals) is currently doubling every 4.1 years.

At a minimum, the 7-page executive summary is worth a careful read.  See: Archambault, E., Amyot, D., Deschamps, P., Nicol, A., Provencher, F., Rebout, L., & Roberge, G. (2014). Proportion of Open Access Papers Published in Peer-Reviewed Journals at the European and World Levels: 1996-2013 (D 1.8 version 11p ed., pp. ix, 41): Science-Metrix.

 

Older papers are increasingly remembered—and cited

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Recently a study done by Google Inc. researchers indicates that older papers are increasingly being found and cited by researchers. The November 4, 2014 paper is freely available at arXiv.org and is entitled On the Shoulders of Giants: The Growing Impact of Older Articles. John Bohannon wrote an interesting Science magazine news report about the study that same day. He notes that the Google researchers used Google Scholar data and “analyzed scientific papers published between 1990 and 2013. They divided the papers into nine broad research areas and 261 subject categories. Then they compared the publication dates of the papers cited in all those papers.”

The study authors hypothesize this may be the effective of mass digitization and the increasing cumulative body of born-digital scholarship.  In the news report, a commentator offers a different hypothesis, that the growth of the scientific literature is slowing, but offers no evidence for that surprising statement (at least to us librarians who see the growth of open access journals and prices/page counts for subscription journals).  A darker hypothesis is that the average quality of papers is decreasing requiring scholars to look further back in time for citable material. However, this last hypothesis is predicated on scholars being particularly diligent in citing only high quality research.

SPIE Digital Library

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index1.pgWe are pleased to announce that the UB Libraries have begun a subscription to the SPIE Digital Library, focused on optics and photonics research. Our subscription allows us access to the full text of all papers appearing in SPIE conference proceedings and SPIE journals. Please note that our subscription does not include access to the SPIE e-books.

From on campus, you can directly access the full text of proceedings and journals in the SPIE Digital Library via http://spiedigitallibrary.org/ as well as connect to and access this content directly through search engines such as Google Scholar. If you are connecting from off-campus however, you should connect via http://libweb.lib.buffalo.edu/pdp/index.asp?ID=598, which will present you with the opportunity to authenticate within your browser session using your UBITname and password.

SPIE publications cover the science and technology of optics and photonics and their application to all fields ranging from imaging, sensors, biomedicine, manufacturing, and energy to nanotechnology, communications, entertainment, and electronics.

UB BioMed Central Membership

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Thanks to funding provided by our Health Sciences Library colleagues, effective October 2, UB is now is a member of one of the best and largest open access publishers, BioMed Central (BMC).

This membership gives UB authors a 15% discount on the article processing charges with no limit on number of articles per year. If you go to our UB member page, you will see how active UB is on BioMed Central. UB researchers had five articles published in BMC journals last month. BMC’s extensive journal list of over 100 titles has considerable breadth including biochemistry, structural biology and ecology titles, for example.
When you submit your research to any of our journals, it will receive rigorous and rapid peer review. If your article is accepted:

  • It will be accessible to anyone with an Internet connection – open access means no subscriptions or ‘pay-per-view’ charges for original research articles.
  • It is more likely to be cited, as it will be freely available to the entire global biological and medical community
  • It will be listed in PubMed within days of publication and also archived in PubMed Central.
  • You retain the copyright of your work
  • You will be able to view your article’s access statistics, which average over 200 downloads per month per article

Please consider publishing in a BMC journal. By submitting your manuscript from a UB location, you should automatically receive a 15% discount on article processing charges. See more information about the benefits of publishing with BioMed Central.

UB Authors Publish for Free: Electrochemical Society Journals

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The Electrochemical Society (ECS) has just announced that since the UB Libraries support a subscription to their journals, UB authors can publish their articles with the benefits of immediate open access at no charge for the rest of 2014. The open access article processing charge of $800 is completely waived. The full announcement is at: http://www.electrochem.org/oa/#apc.

Open access publishing enhances visibility, readership, and getting cited. This is becoming more and more crucial as citation metrics play an increasing role in the evaluation of scholarship (for better or worse). There is also the satisfaction of knowing that scholars in even the poorest countries in the world can access your research without subscription barriers.

Please contact a faculty librarian in the Science and Engineering Information Center if you have any questions about copyright, reserving rights to your work, open access publishing options, reputation of journals (especially when you receive unsolicited offers from an unfamiliar journal), publisher agreements, and article processing charges.