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Science & Engineering Information News


Archive for the ‘Physics’ Category

Your Digital Footprint: Provocative Discussions on Online Privacy & Security

Save the date!

Please join the UB community on Wednesday, October 1, 2014 from 12:00-6:20 p.m. in UB’s Student Union Theater for a provocative campus discussion on online privacy and security with national experts.

There is no cost to attend this event and light refreshments will be offered.

Register at: http://ubtlc.buffalo.edu/workshops/register-your-digital-footprint.asp?eventID=2046

Speakers for “Your Digital Footprint” include:

  • Christina Peters, Chief Privacy Officer for IBM
  • Marcus Ranum, Chief of Security for Tenable Security
  • Brian Boetig, Special Agent in Charge of the Buffalo Office of the FBI
  • Kirsten Martin, Sole Principal Investigator on the 3-year NSF grant funded project, “Addressing Privacy Online,” and Assistant Professor at George Washington University
  • Tracy Mitrano, Director of IT Policy and Institute for Computer Policy and Law at Cornell University

For information and a full schedule, please visit http://digitalchallenges.buffalo.edu/

“Your Digital Footprint” is sponsored by The University Libraries and UB Information Technology, and co-sponsored by the Center of Excellence in Information Systems Assurance Research and Education (CEISARE), the Office of Education Innovation and Assessment, and Student Life.

EndNote Clinics

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endnote_dept_main_X7We will be offering a series of EndNote Clinics in the Science & Engineering Information Center on the 2nd floor of the Silverman Library in Capen Hall.

Bring your laptop to the clinic and our EndNote experts will help you use this free software program, which helps you save, manage and format your references for use in writing papers.  We will also be available at these clinics to help advanced EndNote users troubleshoot any problems you may have using the software.

Required:  Bring your laptop  - and please download the free EndNote software to your laptop in advance from http://library.buffalo.edu/help/endnote/

Dates:  Sept. 24, Oct. 8, Oct. 22, and Nov. 5

Time:  3:00-4:00pm

Questions?  Contact Nancy Schiller, Engineering Librarian, schiller@buffalo.edu

Why You Should be Searching the Web of Science Databases

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webofscienceFind out how the Web of Science can work for you! 

On October 14th, a Web of Science trainer will be in the Science & Engineering Information Center in Silverman Library to demonstrate Web of Science databases and answer your questions. The Web of Science indexes over 12,000 journals, 148,000 conference proceedings, and 50,000 editorially selected books across the sciences, social sciences, and humanities.   Students and faculty in all areas of science and engineering will benefit from these sessions, as well as those from the health and social sciences.

Please Note: Registration is required; see below to register.

WHEN:  Tuesday, October 14th

WHAT: Three sessions will teach you tips and tricks for using the Web of Science databases and how to determine citation metrics and impact factors.   You can come to just one, two, or all three sessions.  Your choice!

SESSION 1           11:30am-1pm     Tips for Searching Web of Science (WoS) [refreshments will be served]

SESSION 2           2pm-3pm             Researching Citation Metrics and Impact Factors Using WoS

SESSION 3           3pm-4pm             Searching the New Patent and Data Citations Indexes on WoS

WHERE:  Science & Engineering Information Center, 2nd floor, Silverman Library, Capen Hall [back by the windows]

PRIZES: Prizes, courtesy of Web of Science, will be awarded at each session!

REGISTRATION:  Please register by October 6th by sending an email to Ruth Oberg in the Silverman Library at oberg@buffalo.edu with the following information:

Your name:

Your department:

Your email:

Which session(s) you will attend:

___        SESSION 1:  Tips for Searching Web of Science (WoS)

___        SESSION 2:  Researching Citation Metrics and Impact Factors Using WoS

___        SESSION 3:  Searching the New Patent and Data Citations Indexes on WoS

Any questions or topics you would like discussed at the sessions:

 

Ask Our Science & Engineering Librarians!

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Librarians from the Science & Engineering Information Center in the Silverman Library will offer a special service to students and faculty during the first two weeks of the fall semester.  From 11:00am to 5:00pm Monday through Friday, science and engineering librarians are available at the library entrance to answer your questions and introduce themselves and their research assistance services to you. Stop by to learn more about UB’s outstanding resources and services and to meet the experts!

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Searching the Patent Literature

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The UB Libraries are no longer subscribing to the U.S. and European patent files on the Engineering Village search platform. Instead, we are recommending that you use one of the free systems listed below for full-text patent searching. These provide the same full-text patent coverage in addition to having built-in tools for analyzing the results of your patent searches:

These resources are described in greater detail on our Patents web guide at: http://libweb.lib.buffalo.edu/guide/guide.asp?ID=137

Thermophysical/Thermochemical Properties – An Authoritative Source

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ThermoLit, a free database built by the National Institute of Science and Technology (NIST), zeroes in on literature references covering over 4 million thermophysical and thermochemical property data points of compounds, systems, and reactions. The search system could not be simpler:

1) Select the System Type (pure compounds, binary mixtures, or tertiary mixtures),
2) Enter compound names, molecular formulas, or CAS Registry Numbers,
3) Select the desired Property Group, e.g., critical properties, phase transition properties, or refractive index,
4) Depending on the property group selected, specify a specific property, e.g., critical temperature, and phase (solid, liquid, gas, etc.)

A highly relevant set of literature references will be returned which can be saved as an Adobe pdf file.

If you have ever struggled to find high quality data such as equilibrium constants for binary or ternary systems, try this resource. ThermoLit’s subtitle is NIST Literature Report Builder for Thermophysical and Thermochemical Property Measurements (NIST Standard Reference Database #171).

IEEE Lunch n’ Learn in the Silverman Library

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Come for a Lunch n’ Learn conducted by the IEEE in the Silverman Library!

Registration is required.

WHEN: Tuesday, March 25th from 12 to 1pm.

WHAT: A one-hour session and demonstration conducted by IEEE staff that will teach you tips and tricks for using the IEEE Xplore database to not only research a topic but also to find jobs or impress potential employers in an interview.  Additional topics covered will include how to save a search and set an alert, how to set up project folders and personalize your settings, how to find papers most cited by US and European patents, how to find papers 1 to 9 months prior to discovery via a Google search, and more.

WHERE:  Science & Engineering Information Center, 2nd floor, Silverman Library, Capen Hall   [back by the windows]

PRIZES:  A variety of prizes will be given away during the session for the best questions.

REGISTRATION:  Attendance is limited and registration is required; the deadline for registering is Tuesday, March 17th.

To register, send an email to Ruth Oberg in the Silverman Library at oberg@buffalo.edu by March 17th with the following information:

1. Your name:

2. Your department:

3. Your email:

4. Your favorite pizza topping: a. cheese, b. cheese/pepperoni, c. vegetarian, d. chicken finger

5. Any questions or topics you would like discussed at the session:

Questions? Contact: Nancy Schiller, Engineering Librarian, schiller@buffalo.edu

 

EndNote Clinics in the Science & Engineering Information Center

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ENDNOTE CLINICS in the Science & Engineering Information Center, 2nd Floor, Silverman Library

Bring your laptop to one of our regularly scheduled Wednesday EndNote clinics between 1 and 2pm and our EndNote experts will help you load and use this free software program, which helps you save, manage and format your references for use in writing papers.  We will also be available at these clinics to help advanced EndNote users troubleshoot any problems you may have using the software. Questions about library resources and services also are encouraged.  All are welcome!

WHERE:  Science & Engineering Information Center, 2nd Floor, Silverman Library, Capen Hall [back by the windows]

WHEN:  Wednesday, from 1-2pm, on the following dates: February 26, March 5, March 12, March 26, April 2, April 9, April 16, April 23, April 30, and May 7   [Note:  There will be no clinic during the week of spring break, March 17th-21st]

Questions:  Contact Nancy Schiller, Engineering Librarian, schiller@buffalo.edu

New Web of Science/Knowledge Interface & Branding

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The next time you log into the Web of Science/Knowledge you will be greeted with a new interface and rebranded platform and database suites.

As to the rebranding, Web of Knowledge brand name has been discontinued. “Web of Knowledge” is rebranded as “Web of Science” (both the platform and the full suite of databases available thereon) and the old “Web of Science” citation database suite is now the “Web of Science Core Collection”.

As to the interface, the look and feel is rather different.  However, the underlying fields and databases remain the same. No content/functionality has been lost, though some of it is hidden from the default view.  There is a helpful “what’s new” page http://images.webofknowledge.com/WOKRS513R8.1/help/WOK/hp_whatsnew_wok.html and for those truly interested, you may wish to watch some of the new short videos at http://wokinfo.com/training_support/training/web-of-science/.

A few of the changes of note:

  • Only one search field will display unless you click “+Add Another Field.”
  • The list of databases/indexes within Web of Science will no longer appear at the bottom of the search screen by default. Instead, towards the top there is an orange chevron beside the “All Databases” header that produces a dropdown menu that will enable you to select a particular database including the Web of Science Core Collection (the classic citation      database cluster).
  • The sort function has been moved to the center of the results page.
  • Times cited is featured more prominently on the right hand side of each article.
  • Keywords  are clickable enabling you to execute a new search.
  • Navigation is simpler. Just use your browser’s forward and backward arrows.
  • Google Scholar will contain links to Web of Science on campus or if you are connected to UB’s IP address off site.

Any questions, don’t hesitate to contact any member of the Science & Engineering Information Center staff or your department’s library liaison.

Discover Magazine’s Top 10 Science Stories of 2013

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by Fred Stoss, Biology, Geology, Ecology, and Mathematics Librarian

The January/February issue of Discover Magazine includes a list of of the top 100 stories in science that they covered in 2013.  The top 10 are summarized below.

  1. New Signs of Long-Gone Life on Mars (if there ever was any, despite conditions that it might have or could have…).
  2. The Supreme World of Genes (the Supreme Court judges BRCA1 And BRACA2 and other naturally occurring genes cannot be patented).
  3. CO2 Hits 400 ppm—Does It Matter? (atmospheric concentrations of CO2 never quite reached 300 ppm in ice-core records 400,000 years old, but steady increases since the last two centuries find levels continuing to rise, as do the debates on the significance of all the CO2.
  4. The Never Ending End of Privacy (the NSA surveillance programs indicate that Santa actually MAY know who is naughty and nice).
  5. Stem Cell Future (liver buds, brain organiods, human stem cells from eggs… grow your own takes on new meanings).
  6. Voyager 1 Goes Interstellar (35+ years, 15+ billion miles and Voyager 1 is now in interstellar space, and a group of unsuspecting space explorers will be waiting in a few centuries to unravel the secrets of a strange space craft, V’Ger, the lost Voyager-6 space probe).
  7. Ready from Prime Time (quests for and about prime numbers add up to a lot of conjectures).
  8. Extracting Family Trees from Ancient Genomes (new DNA extraction techniques and genomic analyses push analyses of DNA samples to 700,000 years [horse] and 400,000 years [hominid], and new tools for evolution also evolve).
  9. Childhood Obesity Reversed (childhood obesity rates, after decades-long increases, showed the first decline among low-income children).
  10. Shaping the Future of Physics (someone found a new geometric shape, the amplituhedron, and may give a new way to look at our expanding universe).

When we look at the disciplinary coverage of all 100 Top Stories, the biomedical and life sciences dominate with 40 stories, followed distantly by environmental/geoscience stories (26), chemistry and physics (15), socio-political aspects of science (10), engineering (5), and mathematics and computational science (4).

Discover Magazine (January/February 2014) is available online full text by several means here at UB, from 01/01/2001 to present in Academic Search Complete, Canadian Reference Centre, MasterFILE Premier and Vocational & Career Collection, in Freely Accessible Journals.