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Oscar A. Silverman Library

Science & Engineering Information News


Archive for the ‘Databases’ Category

Older papers are increasingly remembered—and cited

Recently a study done by Google Inc. researchers indicates that older papers are increasingly being found and cited by researchers. The November 4, 2014 paper is freely available at arXiv.org and is entitled On the Shoulders of Giants: The Growing Impact of Older Articles. John Bohannon wrote an interesting Science magazine news report about the study that same day. He notes that the Google researchers used Google Scholar data and “analyzed scientific papers published between 1990 and 2013. They divided the papers into nine broad research areas and 261 subject categories. Then they compared the publication dates of the papers cited in all those papers.”

The study authors hypothesize this may be the effective of mass digitization and the increasing cumulative body of born-digital scholarship.  In the news report, a commentator offers a different hypothesis, that the growth of the scientific literature is slowing, but offers no evidence for that surprising statement (at least to us librarians who see the growth of open access journals and prices/page counts for subscription journals).  A darker hypothesis is that the average quality of papers is decreasing requiring scholars to look further back in time for citable material. However, this last hypothesis is predicated on scholars being particularly diligent in citing only high quality research.

SPIE Digital Library

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index1.pgWe are pleased to announce that the UB Libraries have begun a subscription to the SPIE Digital Library, focused on optics and photonics research. Our subscription allows us access to the full text of all papers appearing in SPIE conference proceedings and SPIE journals. Please note that our subscription does not include access to the SPIE e-books.

From on campus, you can directly access the full text of proceedings and journals in the SPIE Digital Library via http://spiedigitallibrary.org/ as well as connect to and access this content directly through search engines such as Google Scholar. If you are connecting from off-campus however, you should connect via http://libweb.lib.buffalo.edu/pdp/index.asp?ID=598, which will present you with the opportunity to authenticate within your browser session using your UBITname and password.

SPIE publications cover the science and technology of optics and photonics and their application to all fields ranging from imaging, sensors, biomedicine, manufacturing, and energy to nanotechnology, communications, entertainment, and electronics.

“Web of Science Day” Re-Cap

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Web of Science Training in the SEIC

Yesterday’s Web of Science Day was a great success, with UB students and faculty in attendance for three sessions on how to effectively search the Web of Science databases for information and citation data.

Some of the things that UB students and faculty learned in the Science & Engineering Information Center yesterday:

  • How to use Boolean logic to construct effective keyword searches.
  • How to create a citation report for individual authors, departments, schools, or sets of reference; these reports include automatically generated graphs and calculate basic statistics about articles in the set, including h-index and average citations per item.
  • How to set it up saved searches which will automatically run against the Web of Science databases on a schedule you set (weekly, bi-weekly, monthly), with the search results e-mailed to you.
  • How to use Web of Science with EndNote to download citations into your own EndNote database to sort, search, annotate, and cite.
  • How to find recent patents as well as data sets.
  • What a journal impact factor is, and how you can use it to decide where to publish.

New Everything Search: Importing References into EndNote

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The University Libraries rolled out a new “Everything” default search tab on our home page that searches many of our databases, our catalog, and much more. Results from an Everything search are easily exported to EndNote, the personal citation manager supported by the library. After downloading EndNote, one can save, search, and edit references as well as create bibliographies and documents with automatically formatted citations in over 5,000 styles.

To export references from an Everything search, click on the very light gray folder with a plus sign icon to the far right of the title for each item of interest. This places the items in a temporary folder of saved items. Each time you add an item, the large folder icon on the dark blue banner at the top keeps count.

When you are ready to export the references, open your EndNote library. Then back in your browser, click on the large folder icon at the top, Click on the dropdown arrow beside “Export As” and choose the “EndNote” option. Your browser usually asks you if you wish to open or save the file.  Choose ‘Open”. The references should appear in your EndNote library.

Why You Should be Searching the Web of Science Databases

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webofscienceFind out how the Web of Science can work for you! 

On October 14th, a Web of Science trainer will be in the Science & Engineering Information Center in Silverman Library to demonstrate Web of Science databases and answer your questions. The Web of Science indexes over 12,000 journals, 148,000 conference proceedings, and 50,000 editorially selected books across the sciences, social sciences, and humanities.   Students and faculty in all areas of science and engineering will benefit from these sessions, as well as those from the health and social sciences.

WHEN:  Tuesday, October 14th

WHAT: Three sessions will teach you tips and tricks for using the Web of Science databases and how to determine citation metrics and impact factors.   You can come to just one, two, or all three sessions.  Your choice!

SESSION 1           11:30am-1pm     Tips for Searching Web of Science (WoS) [refreshments will be served]

SESSION 2           2pm-3pm             Researching Citation Metrics and Impact Factors Using WoS

SESSION 3           3pm-4pm             Searching the New Patent and Data Citations Indexes on WoS

WHERE:  Science & Engineering Information Center, 2nd floor, Silverman Library, Capen Hall [back by the windows]

PRIZES: Prizes, courtesy of Web of Science, will be awarded at each session!

See you there!

Searching the Patent Literature

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The UB Libraries are no longer subscribing to the U.S. and European patent files on the Engineering Village search platform. Instead, we are recommending that you use one of the free systems listed below for full-text patent searching. These provide the same full-text patent coverage in addition to having built-in tools for analyzing the results of your patent searches:

These resources are described in greater detail on our Patents web guide at: http://libweb.lib.buffalo.edu/guide/guide.asp?ID=137

Thermophysical/Thermochemical Properties – An Authoritative Source

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ThermoLit, a free database built by the National Institute of Science and Technology (NIST), zeroes in on literature references covering over 4 million thermophysical and thermochemical property data points of compounds, systems, and reactions. The search system could not be simpler:

1) Select the System Type (pure compounds, binary mixtures, or tertiary mixtures),
2) Enter compound names, molecular formulas, or CAS Registry Numbers,
3) Select the desired Property Group, e.g., critical properties, phase transition properties, or refractive index,
4) Depending on the property group selected, specify a specific property, e.g., critical temperature, and phase (solid, liquid, gas, etc.)

A highly relevant set of literature references will be returned which can be saved as an Adobe pdf file.

If you have ever struggled to find high quality data such as equilibrium constants for binary or ternary systems, try this resource. ThermoLit’s subtitle is NIST Literature Report Builder for Thermophysical and Thermochemical Property Measurements (NIST Standard Reference Database #171).

Access JoVE, The Journal of Visual Experiments

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The Journal of Visualized Experiments (JoVE) is an online journal of visualized (video-based) biological and life science research procedures and methods. Articles published in JoVE focus on experimental techniques and procedures used in laboratory settings for conducting research. These procedures are captured and displayed as videos with written explanations that include graphics and illustrations, and are enhanced with narrations and explanations in video formats. Coverage at UB is facilitated from Vol. 1 (2006) to the near present, excluding the two most recent years with exceptions: some articles published within the past two years may be available due to requirements to have certain resources in the public domain available. This also means that some articles published within the past two years may not be available due to publisher restrictions. You can access JoVE directly by going to the E-journals page at  and enter the term “jove” in the search box; then click on the link to Free Medical Journals or PubMed Central.

Related Resources (these are not linked to video-based links, but do provide access to print protocols)

 

IEEE Lunch n’ Learn Reprised

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We had a lively Lunch n’ Learn session in the Science & Engineering Information Center in Silverman Library yesterday. The one-hour session was conducted by IEEE’s Ruth Wolfish and attended by about 30 UB students in electrical engineering and computer science.  Students got a detailed overview of the IEEE Xplore database, including tips for using it not only for academic research but also for finding jobs.  The session included lunch and prizes for the best questions.

IEEE-Lunch-n-Learn-DSC_1943

Librarians Jill Hackenberg and Fred Stoss check in a student at the registration desk


Ruth Wolfish from IEEE demonstrates the IEEE Xplore database

IEEE-Lunch-n-Learn-DSC_1963

Students attend library session on doing research in electrical engineering and computer science

New Web of Science/Knowledge Interface & Branding

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The next time you log into the Web of Science/Knowledge you will be greeted with a new interface and rebranded platform and database suites.

As to the rebranding, Web of Knowledge brand name has been discontinued. “Web of Knowledge” is rebranded as “Web of Science” (both the platform and the full suite of databases available thereon) and the old “Web of Science” citation database suite is now the “Web of Science Core Collection”.

As to the interface, the look and feel is rather different.  However, the underlying fields and databases remain the same. No content/functionality has been lost, though some of it is hidden from the default view.  There is a helpful “what’s new” page http://images.webofknowledge.com/WOKRS513R8.1/help/WOK/hp_whatsnew_wok.html and for those truly interested, you may wish to watch some of the new short videos at http://wokinfo.com/training_support/training/web-of-science/.

A few of the changes of note:

  • Only one search field will display unless you click “+Add Another Field.”
  • The list of databases/indexes within Web of Science will no longer appear at the bottom of the search screen by default. Instead, towards the top there is an orange chevron beside the “All Databases” header that produces a dropdown menu that will enable you to select a particular database including the Web of Science Core Collection (the classic citation      database cluster).
  • The sort function has been moved to the center of the results page.
  • Times cited is featured more prominently on the right hand side of each article.
  • Keywords  are clickable enabling you to execute a new search.
  • Navigation is simpler. Just use your browser’s forward and backward arrows.
  • Google Scholar will contain links to Web of Science on campus or if you are connected to UB’s IP address off site.

Any questions, don’t hesitate to contact any member of the Science & Engineering Information Center staff or your department’s library liaison.