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Archive for the ‘Databases’ Category

Access JoVE, The Journal of Visual Experiments

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The Journal of Visualized Experiments (JoVE) is an online journal of visualized (video-based) biological and life science research procedures and methods. Articles published in JoVE focus on experimental techniques and procedures used in laboratory settings for conducting research. These procedures are captured and displayed as videos with written explanations that include graphics and illustrations, and are enhanced with narrations and explanations in video formats. Coverage at UB is facilitated from Vol. 1 (2006) to the near present, excluding the two most recent years with exceptions: some articles published within the past two years may be available due to requirements to have certain resources in the public domain available. This also means that some articles published within the past two years may not be available due to publisher restrictions. You can access JoVE directly by going to the E-journals page at  and enter the term “jove” in the search box; then click on the link to Free Medical Journals or PubMed Central.

Related Resources (these are not linked to video-based links, but do provide access to print protocols)

 

IEEE Lunch n’ Learn Reprised

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We had a lively Lunch n’ Learn session in the Science & Engineering Information Center in Silverman Library yesterday. The one-hour session was conducted by IEEE’s Ruth Wolfish and attended by about 30 UB students in electrical engineering and computer science.  Students got a detailed overview of the IEEE Xplore database, including tips for using it not only for academic research but also for finding jobs.  The session included lunch and prizes for the best questions.

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Librarians Jill Hackenberg and Fred Stoss check in a student at the registration desk


Ruth Wolfish from IEEE demonstrates the IEEE Xplore database

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Students attend library session on doing research in electrical engineering and computer science

New Web of Science/Knowledge Interface & Branding

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The next time you log into the Web of Science/Knowledge you will be greeted with a new interface and rebranded platform and database suites.

As to the rebranding, Web of Knowledge brand name has been discontinued. “Web of Knowledge” is rebranded as “Web of Science” (both the platform and the full suite of databases available thereon) and the old “Web of Science” citation database suite is now the “Web of Science Core Collection”.

As to the interface, the look and feel is rather different.  However, the underlying fields and databases remain the same. No content/functionality has been lost, though some of it is hidden from the default view.  There is a helpful “what’s new” page http://images.webofknowledge.com/WOKRS513R8.1/help/WOK/hp_whatsnew_wok.html and for those truly interested, you may wish to watch some of the new short videos at http://wokinfo.com/training_support/training/web-of-science/.

A few of the changes of note:

  • Only one search field will display unless you click “+Add Another Field.”
  • The list of databases/indexes within Web of Science will no longer appear at the bottom of the search screen by default. Instead, towards the top there is an orange chevron beside the “All Databases” header that produces a dropdown menu that will enable you to select a particular database including the Web of Science Core Collection (the classic citation      database cluster).
  • The sort function has been moved to the center of the results page.
  • Times cited is featured more prominently on the right hand side of each article.
  • Keywords  are clickable enabling you to execute a new search.
  • Navigation is simpler. Just use your browser’s forward and backward arrows.
  • Google Scholar will contain links to Web of Science on campus or if you are connected to UB’s IP address off site.

Any questions, don’t hesitate to contact any member of the Science & Engineering Information Center staff or your department’s library liaison.

Impressions: Charleston Conference 2013

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by A. Ben Wagner, Sciences Librarian

The Charleston Conference focuses on electronic resources and collection issues such as open access, MOOC’s, altmetrics, citation metrics and management,  and copyright. Many of the presentations are freely available by going to the online program, hovering one’s mouse over the session title until the abstract pop-up window appears and then clicking on the “Slides” button, or in cases of multiple files, embedded links within the abstract text. There are some extraordinary presentations, and most of the slides clearly convey much of the content. http://2013charlestonconference.sched.org/

My impressions:

A)     Open Access is developing an air of inevitability what with the Federal funding agencies having submitted open article and open data proposals now under internal (confidential) review per the February 2013 White House directive and the major announcement by the American Chemical Society of 4 new/enhanced open access programs including a brand new open access (OA) journal, ACS Central Science.

B)      I was disappointed that there is no timetable for finishing the review of federal funding agencies OA proposals to provide open access.  Nor is there any guarantee or indication of what, if any, public review will eventually take place.

C)      There is a lively, continuing debate over if libraries should maintain a fund to pay article processing charges (APC’s) for open access publication. And if they do, what conditions should be place on it such as a cap on the fee, embargo period, and publications funded per author per year. One interesting criteria was a requirement that the item be deposited in the institutional repository. Much of the debate focuses on sustainability, given library budgets, and good will/tangible support for OA vs. administrative headaches. Fundamental issues include:

  1. Library forced into supporting two systems (subscriptions & APC’s).
  2. Will this just be the same publishers making more money?
  3. Are we biasing authors towards the minority of OA journals that charge APC’s vs. the majority that do not?
  4. Researchers are not taking ownership of the costs of dissemination so have we really changed the system. How can we encourage decisions based on price and bring competitive forces into play?

D)     Lots of talk about article level metrics (so-called altmetrics). More and more publishers and database vendors are setting up licenses with altmetrics firms such as ImpactStory, Plum Analytics, and Altmetric.com. Public Library of Science, Highwire Press, and the American Institute of Physics are just three of a rapidly increasing number of publishers now showing article-level metrics of some type, even if it is only downloads and reads.

E)      No surprise that MOOC’s (massive open online courses) were discussed.  Some observations that were made:

  1. The only reason our reference services work is that so few of our patrons take advantage of them. Scale is an old problem, but MOOC’s could instantly overwhelm our services.
  2. Obvious problems with copyright/use of materials. Although permissions are sometimes possible, MOOC content understandably gravitates towards public domain/Creative Commons licensing material.  This is especially true when students may come from scores of countries with varying copyright and fair use laws, or having no fair use recognized at all.
  3. MOOC’s will destroy traditional textbooks before they destroy higher education (the “college experience” is a value-added dimension not easily replicated).
  4. Educators and librarians who are supporters of open access publishing whereby publishers are threatened, suddenly have a different attitude when it comes to MOOC’s which threaten higher ed and libraries.  What’s good for the goose is good for the gander?
  5. WARNING: Most MOOC platforms treat you (the library/scholar) as publisher requiring you to warrant compliance with all intellectual property/copyright law.
  6. A tricky and uncertain legal situation where institution is non-profit and course/platform is for profit.  Be careful.

F)      Fair use strengthened and reaffirmed by recent court cases. There have been some “nuisance” or really picky cases, e.g. use of 9 words in a film, correctly attributed to Faulkner where overzealous copyright holders have been roundly defeated. Often victorious on the grounds of transformative use; this is becoming a key legal argument.

G)     A real concern among librarians and publishers that a somewhat recent change in Google Scholar ranking algorithms penalized journal articles behind pay walls. A few studies have indicated that this has a variable, but at times significant effect. JSTOR in particular suffered a significant drop in traffic from Google Scholar.

H)     Libraries are seeing a real mix of citation management tools in use on their campus and are trying to figure out how many and how to support all the tools patrons are interested in.  Some universities have developed detailed, yet summary, comparison charts such as Univ. of Wisconsin-Madison, University of Washington, and Penn State. We should either link to these or develop our own.  One presentation indicated:

  1. Individual work – RefWorks, EndNote, Papers
  2. Collaborative Work – Zotero & Mendeley
  3. Multi-language – RefWorks, Zotero
  4. Compatibility with BibTex – Mendeley
  5. Multiple OS – Mendeley

I)        Study of ILL requests after large journal cancellation projects at 3 North Carolina universities showed minimal impact on ILL operations with only 1%-4% of the requests in the subsequent year being from the cancelled journals.

J)       Fifteen new resources/innovations were highlighted in 5-minute presentations in a plenary product showcase:

  1. ACSESS DL – a digital library back to 1908 created by an alliance of three crop, soil, and environmental societies.
  2. ISNI – International Standard Name Identifier – real progress on a standard universal number for authors/scholars. ORCID will be a subset of the ISNI database.  This is operational (6.4 million individuals & 400,000 organizations), and they are doing retrospective assignments.
  3. Docuseek2 – streams social issue and documentary film videos.
  4. Elsevier Reference Modules – bundles reference works, book chapters, and articles by discipline using the ScienceDirect platform.
  5. Dictionary of American Regional English Digital (Harvard Univ. Press) – e-version greatly enriched with sound recordings, map interface, etc.
  6. AccessScience – McGraw Hill (not sure why this long-time product made the list)
  7. Proquest Research Companion – similar to our Research Tips web site, i.e. how to write a paper.
  8. ArtStor Shared Shelf – organizations can now catalog, upload, manage, and share loca media collections. Neat!
  9. SIPX – outsourced end-to-end solution for copyright and IP management for learning management systems and MOOCs.
  10. SPIE Open Access Program – 1/3 of authors now choose open access option at $100 per page.
  11. New Taylor & Francis Library/Info Science Journal Open Access Policy – full green OA, deposit in IR and use in LMS permitted, 50 tokens for free access that can be given out to anyone.
  12. ASM Science (American Soc. of Micobiology) – new digital library platform, books free of digital rights management restrictions.
  13. Thieme e-clinical platforms (Thieme eNeurosurgery, Thieme eOtolaryngology, Thieme eSpine) – comprehensive, multimedia platforms pulling together textbooks, books, videos, procedures, journal articles, and PubMed information.
  14. Browzine (Third Iron) – organizes both open access and subscription articles into a unified, composite journal which is placed on a common, library-branded newsstand and easily accessible from a tablet.
  15. Next Gen Web of Science (Thomson Reuters) – new “clean” interface, Google Scholar partnership whereby WOS citations show in Google Scholar results for WOS customers & full-text link to Google Scholar from WOS, more regional content.

K)      Readcube is making some waves in the rental/pay-per-article field.  3 levels of access: rental, cloud purchase, and PDF purchase. Currently 110 journals, but includes Nature Publishing Group, and they say they are growing.

October Workshops in the Science & Engineering Information Center

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This October, the UB Libraries’ new Science & Engineering Information Center on the 2nd floor of Silverman Library is offering two hands-on workshops for UB science and engineering students, faculty, and staff.

Workshop #1:  Electronic Books in Science & Engineering

When:  October 23, 2013, from 11:00 am to 12:30 pm

Where:  Science & Engineering Information Center, 2nd floor, Silverman Library, Capen Hall (back by the windows)

What:   There are thousands of electronic books in science and engineering that the UB Libraries have purchased for your use in your coursework and research.  These are not necessarily textbooks, though many of them do offer an introduction to topics as diverse as applied mathematics, finite element method, calculus, Java scripting, and more, while others provide in-depth coverage of specialized topics in chemistry, biology, computer science, all areas of engineering, geology, physics, mathematics, and statistics.  Come and learn how to find, search, print from, download, take notes in, cite, and build personalized virtual bookshelves of electronic books in science and engineering.

What You Need to Do:  Just show up!

Highly Recommended:   Bring your laptop/tablet.  We will start with a short formal presentation and then work with you individually.

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Workshop #2:   Get Cited or Perish:  Citation Metrics for Tenure, Promotions & Grants

When:  October 29, 2013, from 3:30 pm to 5:00 pm

Where:  Science & Engineering Information Center, 2nd floor, Silverman Library, Capen Hall (back by the windows)

What:  Increasingly, citations to one’s publications are being used as part of the evaluation of dossiers, departments, and grants. Hence, it is important to not only figure out where to publish, but also how to get cited and accurately count those citations. This workshop will give you insight into tools such as Web of Knowledge and Google Scholar Citations so that you can better understand the contribution your research has made to the scientific literature. You will learn how to find specific metrics like the h-index and journal impact factors.

What You Need to Do:   Just show up!

Highly Recommended:   Bring your laptop/tablet.  We will start with a presentation that includes live demos, which you can follow on your device. Then our staff will work with you individually or in small groups.

Questions?  Contact Nancy Schiller, Engineering Librarian, Science & Engineering Information Center, 2nd Floor, Capen Hall, schiller@buffalo.edu, 716-645-1338

 

UB Science & Engineering Students! Take the Knovel University Challenge and be eligible to win prizes!

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Every year, the Knovel University Challenge allows students to compete for prizes while learning how to use Knovel, a research tool and e-book database that the UB Libraries subscribes to; Knovel can help you complete assignments as well as research topics and find properties data, equations, and more.  This year, Knovel asked engineering professors to help them develop questions that would test your knowledge while providing real-life examples of problem sets they assign students.

The Dates: The contest starts September 9, 2013, and ends December 1, 2013.  REMEMBER TO PLAY WEEKLY!

The Prizes: There are both weekly and end-of-contest prizes! Answer correctly and you could win Roku Media Players, Pebble Smartwatches, Samsung Chromebooks, and more…

START PLAYING NOW!   Connect from on-campus via http://www.knoveluniversitychallenge.com

Let the Games Begin!

knovel 2013 challenge logo

 

Journal Impact Factors – New Edition Covering 2012 Data

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Thomson Reuters Research Analytics has just released a new edition of its Journal Citation Reports (JCR) providing impact factors and other citation and influence metrics for more than 10,000 journals from 83 countries. The University Libraries provides a site-wide license to this database.  The citation data comes from the Web of Science,  one of the largest and oldest citation databases.  JCR is issued in two editions: Science (& Technology) and Social Sciences.

According to the Thomson Reuters press release,  a total of 379 journals received their first Journal Impact Factor. Additionally, 37 journals were suppressed due to questionable citation activity. Note that Thomson is now referring to the new edition as 2013 (based on the year that it was released), but all the data is from 2012. In the Journal Citation Reports interface, it is still referred to by the year the data was collected; i.e., the 2012 edition.

Alternately, there are now a number of free web sites that evaluate the impact of journals including Eigenfactor, SCImago, and Google Scholar Metrics for Journals. Consulting these sites is useful in order to cross-check to JCR rankings and in cases where a journal is not covered by JCR.

Cold Springs Harbor Protocols

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Thanks to our health science library colleagues, we now have access to the Cold Springs Harbor Protocols (2006+) at http://libweb.lib.buffalo.edu/pdp/index.asp?ID=556.

Cold Spring Harbor Protocols is an interdisciplinary monthly journal of step-by-step research methods in cell, developmental and molecular biology, genetics, bioinformatics, protein science, computational biology, immunology, neuroscience and imaging. All protocols are up-to-date and presented in a consistent, easy-to-follow format.

Protocols is fully searchable by keyword and subject, and has several novel features including subject categories (including but not limited to antibodies, DNA delivery/gene transfer, electrophoresis, High-throughput analysis, imaging/microscopy, kits, laboratory organisms, plant biology, polymerase chain reaction (PCR), RNA interference (RNAi)/siRNA, and stem cells) as well as a full listing of “recipes” for preparing solutions and biological reagents.

 

Celebrating a Milestone in Biology with a New Database

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This announcement comes to you on the “Diamond Celebration” of the 60th Anniversary of one of biology’s greatest accomplishments.  Codebreakers: Makers of Modern Genetics is a new online database offered by the Wellcome Library in London. It provides a historical glimpse into the race to deduce the chemical structure of the DNA molecule. The crux of this resource is the April 25, 1953 landmark paper published by James Watson and Francis Crick in the journal, Nature, where they reported the chemical structure of DNA, a feat that stimulated a biological revolution that is still unfolding.

Codebreakers brings together more than one million photographs, sketches, notes, and essays related to the Watson & Crick investigation of DNA’s chemical structure. Future plans call for adding resources from 20 smaller collections, 650 digitized images and 500,000 additional pages of text. This $5.88 million dollar project is one of the world’s most comprehensive sources for a cross-disciplinary look at one of the greatest scientific discoveries of all time. Additional information is found at: http://wellcomelibrary.org/using-the-library/subject-guides/genetics/makers-of-modern-genetics.

Database Snapshot: Lecture Notes in Computer Science

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Full-text of the popular Springer book series Lecture Notes in Computer Science (LNCS) includes Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence (LNAI) and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics (LNBI). Most volumes are conference proceedings. Major areas covered in this database are computer science, engineering, math, biology, statistics, GIS, information science, informatics, communication science, physics, bioinformatics, multimedia, and medical imaging. The database includes volumes from 1997-present. Some LNCS volumes in print are owned by the UB Libraries. Users can also refer to the LNCS/AI/BI Conference Acronym Index.

Tips for using Lecture Notes in Computer Science

Enter your terms in the search box in the blue bar (not the upper one). In the results list, full-text is noted with “Download PDF”. Refine your search using the left column of refine options. References for articles and related content are given on the item page.