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Oscar A. Silverman Library

Science & Engineering Information News


Archive for the ‘EndNote’ Category

New Everything Search: Importing References into EndNote

The University Libraries rolled out a new “Everything” default search tab on our home page that searches many of our databases, our catalog, and much more. Results from an Everything search are easily exported to EndNote, the personal citation manager supported by the library. After downloading EndNote, one can save, search, and edit references as well as create bibliographies and documents with automatically formatted citations in over 5,000 styles.

To export references from an Everything search, click on the very light gray folder with a plus sign icon to the far right of the title for each item of interest. This places the items in a temporary folder of saved items. Each time you add an item, the large folder icon on the dark blue banner at the top keeps count.

When you are ready to export the references, open your EndNote library. Then back in your browser, click on the large folder icon at the top, Click on the dropdown arrow beside “Export As” and choose the “EndNote” option. Your browser usually asks you if you wish to open or save the file.  Choose ‘Open”. The references should appear in your EndNote library.

EndNote Clinics

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endnote_dept_main_X7We will be offering a series of EndNote Clinics in the Science & Engineering Information Center on the 2nd floor of the Silverman Library in Capen Hall.

Bring your laptop to the clinic and our EndNote experts will help you use this free software program, which helps you save, manage and format your references for use in writing papers.  We will also be available at these clinics to help advanced EndNote users troubleshoot any problems you may have using the software.

Required:  Bring your laptop  - and please download the free EndNote software to your laptop in advance from http://library.buffalo.edu/help/endnote/

Dates:  Sept. 24, Oct. 8, Oct. 22, and Nov. 5

Time:  3:00-4:00pm

Questions?  Contact Nancy Schiller, Engineering Librarian, schiller@buffalo.edu

EndNote Clinics in the Science & Engineering Information Center

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ENDNOTE CLINICS in the Science & Engineering Information Center, 2nd Floor, Silverman Library

Bring your laptop to one of our regularly scheduled Wednesday EndNote clinics between 1 and 2pm and our EndNote experts will help you load and use this free software program, which helps you save, manage and format your references for use in writing papers.  We will also be available at these clinics to help advanced EndNote users troubleshoot any problems you may have using the software. Questions about library resources and services also are encouraged.  All are welcome!

WHERE:  Science & Engineering Information Center, 2nd Floor, Silverman Library, Capen Hall [back by the windows]

WHEN:  Wednesday, from 1-2pm, on the following dates: February 26, March 5, March 12, March 26, April 2, April 9, April 16, April 23, April 30, and May 7   [Note:  There will be no clinic during the week of spring break, March 17th-21st]

Questions:  Contact Nancy Schiller, Engineering Librarian, schiller@buffalo.edu

Impressions: Charleston Conference 2013

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by A. Ben Wagner, Sciences Librarian

The Charleston Conference focuses on electronic resources and collection issues such as open access, MOOC’s, altmetrics, citation metrics and management,  and copyright. Many of the presentations are freely available by going to the online program, hovering one’s mouse over the session title until the abstract pop-up window appears and then clicking on the “Slides” button, or in cases of multiple files, embedded links within the abstract text. There are some extraordinary presentations, and most of the slides clearly convey much of the content. http://2013charlestonconference.sched.org/

My impressions:

A)     Open Access is developing an air of inevitability what with the Federal funding agencies having submitted open article and open data proposals now under internal (confidential) review per the February 2013 White House directive and the major announcement by the American Chemical Society of 4 new/enhanced open access programs including a brand new open access (OA) journal, ACS Central Science.

B)      I was disappointed that there is no timetable for finishing the review of federal funding agencies OA proposals to provide open access.  Nor is there any guarantee or indication of what, if any, public review will eventually take place.

C)      There is a lively, continuing debate over if libraries should maintain a fund to pay article processing charges (APC’s) for open access publication. And if they do, what conditions should be place on it such as a cap on the fee, embargo period, and publications funded per author per year. One interesting criteria was a requirement that the item be deposited in the institutional repository. Much of the debate focuses on sustainability, given library budgets, and good will/tangible support for OA vs. administrative headaches. Fundamental issues include:

  1. Library forced into supporting two systems (subscriptions & APC’s).
  2. Will this just be the same publishers making more money?
  3. Are we biasing authors towards the minority of OA journals that charge APC’s vs. the majority that do not?
  4. Researchers are not taking ownership of the costs of dissemination so have we really changed the system. How can we encourage decisions based on price and bring competitive forces into play?

D)     Lots of talk about article level metrics (so-called altmetrics). More and more publishers and database vendors are setting up licenses with altmetrics firms such as ImpactStory, Plum Analytics, and Altmetric.com. Public Library of Science, Highwire Press, and the American Institute of Physics are just three of a rapidly increasing number of publishers now showing article-level metrics of some type, even if it is only downloads and reads.

E)      No surprise that MOOC’s (massive open online courses) were discussed.  Some observations that were made:

  1. The only reason our reference services work is that so few of our patrons take advantage of them. Scale is an old problem, but MOOC’s could instantly overwhelm our services.
  2. Obvious problems with copyright/use of materials. Although permissions are sometimes possible, MOOC content understandably gravitates towards public domain/Creative Commons licensing material.  This is especially true when students may come from scores of countries with varying copyright and fair use laws, or having no fair use recognized at all.
  3. MOOC’s will destroy traditional textbooks before they destroy higher education (the “college experience” is a value-added dimension not easily replicated).
  4. Educators and librarians who are supporters of open access publishing whereby publishers are threatened, suddenly have a different attitude when it comes to MOOC’s which threaten higher ed and libraries.  What’s good for the goose is good for the gander?
  5. WARNING: Most MOOC platforms treat you (the library/scholar) as publisher requiring you to warrant compliance with all intellectual property/copyright law.
  6. A tricky and uncertain legal situation where institution is non-profit and course/platform is for profit.  Be careful.

F)      Fair use strengthened and reaffirmed by recent court cases. There have been some “nuisance” or really picky cases, e.g. use of 9 words in a film, correctly attributed to Faulkner where overzealous copyright holders have been roundly defeated. Often victorious on the grounds of transformative use; this is becoming a key legal argument.

G)     A real concern among librarians and publishers that a somewhat recent change in Google Scholar ranking algorithms penalized journal articles behind pay walls. A few studies have indicated that this has a variable, but at times significant effect. JSTOR in particular suffered a significant drop in traffic from Google Scholar.

H)     Libraries are seeing a real mix of citation management tools in use on their campus and are trying to figure out how many and how to support all the tools patrons are interested in.  Some universities have developed detailed, yet summary, comparison charts such as Univ. of Wisconsin-Madison, University of Washington, and Penn State. We should either link to these or develop our own.  One presentation indicated:

  1. Individual work – RefWorks, EndNote, Papers
  2. Collaborative Work – Zotero & Mendeley
  3. Multi-language – RefWorks, Zotero
  4. Compatibility with BibTex – Mendeley
  5. Multiple OS – Mendeley

I)        Study of ILL requests after large journal cancellation projects at 3 North Carolina universities showed minimal impact on ILL operations with only 1%-4% of the requests in the subsequent year being from the cancelled journals.

J)       Fifteen new resources/innovations were highlighted in 5-minute presentations in a plenary product showcase:

  1. ACSESS DL – a digital library back to 1908 created by an alliance of three crop, soil, and environmental societies.
  2. ISNI – International Standard Name Identifier – real progress on a standard universal number for authors/scholars. ORCID will be a subset of the ISNI database.  This is operational (6.4 million individuals & 400,000 organizations), and they are doing retrospective assignments.
  3. Docuseek2 – streams social issue and documentary film videos.
  4. Elsevier Reference Modules – bundles reference works, book chapters, and articles by discipline using the ScienceDirect platform.
  5. Dictionary of American Regional English Digital (Harvard Univ. Press) – e-version greatly enriched with sound recordings, map interface, etc.
  6. AccessScience – McGraw Hill (not sure why this long-time product made the list)
  7. Proquest Research Companion – similar to our Research Tips web site, i.e. how to write a paper.
  8. ArtStor Shared Shelf – organizations can now catalog, upload, manage, and share loca media collections. Neat!
  9. SIPX – outsourced end-to-end solution for copyright and IP management for learning management systems and MOOCs.
  10. SPIE Open Access Program – 1/3 of authors now choose open access option at $100 per page.
  11. New Taylor & Francis Library/Info Science Journal Open Access Policy – full green OA, deposit in IR and use in LMS permitted, 50 tokens for free access that can be given out to anyone.
  12. ASM Science (American Soc. of Micobiology) – new digital library platform, books free of digital rights management restrictions.
  13. Thieme e-clinical platforms (Thieme eNeurosurgery, Thieme eOtolaryngology, Thieme eSpine) – comprehensive, multimedia platforms pulling together textbooks, books, videos, procedures, journal articles, and PubMed information.
  14. Browzine (Third Iron) – organizes both open access and subscription articles into a unified, composite journal which is placed on a common, library-branded newsstand and easily accessible from a tablet.
  15. Next Gen Web of Science (Thomson Reuters) – new “clean” interface, Google Scholar partnership whereby WOS citations show in Google Scholar results for WOS customers & full-text link to Google Scholar from WOS, more regional content.

K)      Readcube is making some waves in the rental/pay-per-article field.  3 levels of access: rental, cloud purchase, and PDF purchase. Currently 110 journals, but includes Nature Publishing Group, and they say they are growing.

Bring Your EndNote Questions to Us!

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Dates and Times:  Monday, September 16, from 3:00-4:30 pm AND Thursday, September 19, from 12:00-1:30pm

Location:  Science & Engineering Information Center, 2nd Floor, Silverman Library, Capen Hall

Come get a brief overview of EndNote, software freely provided by the library for UB students and faculty that helps you save, manage and format your references for use in writing papers.  The overview will be followed by an opportunity for you to talk one-on-one with an EndNote expert on our staff who can answer questions and help you solve problems you may be having with EndNote.

We recommend that you bring your laptop with you and that you load the EndNote software for it in advance from: http://library.buffalo.edu/help/endnote/ 

All are welcome!

Instructions for Downloading the ASCE Style Format into EndNote

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When you download the EndNote software, it will only contain the top 100 “most popular” style formats, not all of the 3,000+ style formats that are actually available. The ASCE style format, used by civil, structural, and environmental engineers, is not in the “top 100,” and so, for you to be able to use it in EndNote, you need to download the ASCE style file from the EndNote.com website and save and then copy it into the EndNote file folder on your computer.

Here’s how to do that:

  1. Go to: http://www.endnote.com/support/enstyles.asp
  2. In the search box in the top middle of the page labeled “Style Finder,” where it says “Publication Name,” type in: ASCE
  3. Click on the dark green “Find Styles” button over to the right.
  4. On the next screen, click on “Download.”
  5. Depending on your browser, you may (or may not) get a pop-up window or bar asking you if you want to proceed with the download; click to allow the download.
  6. You will then be given the option to SAVE or OPEN the file. Select the SAVE FILE option.  NOTE: The file will be called ASCE.ens (the “ens” extension stands for EndNote style).
  7. Next you need to find where your computer saved the downloaded file; often, unless you have changed the setting, the default setting for saving downloaded files will be C:\Downloads.
  8. Find the ASCE.ens file, copy it from the downloaded location, and paste it into your C:\Programs\EndNoteX5 folder. NOTE: On some computers, this may be labeled C:\Programs(x86)\EndNote X5.
  9. Now, open up EndNoteX5.
  10. In the upper left portion of the top EndNote tool bar, there is a box for selecting style formats (it may be set to “Annotated,” which is the default setting, or to whatever style you used last). Find that box. It has a drop-down menu; use it to highlight and select the “Select Another Style” option.
  11. This will open up a “Choose a Style” box. You should now be able to see there ASCE as a style format option. Highlight it and then click on the “Choose” button.
  12. This will make ASCE style your default style format setting in EndNote. To check it, highlight one of your EndNote references. At the bottom of the screen in the box you will see there, click on the “Preview” button; the citation should display in the preview windowpane in ASCE style format.

If you have problems with the above procedure, contact: Nancy Schiller, Engineering Librarian, schiller@buffalo.edu.

If you cannot find the output style format you need in EndNote, contact your subject librarian for help.

EndNote X5 Now Available

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EndNote version X5 for Windows is now available for downloading from the UB Endnote Software website. EndNote is available to authorized University at Buffalo faculty, students and staff only.

What’s New in EndNote X5

  • Add and Transfer File Attachments to the Web
  • View and Annotate PDF files
  • Update a Reference Automatically
  • New Cite While You Write Options

Visit the EndNote X5 New Features website for more details.