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UB Libraries News Archive

All the articles here are archived. Please check the Libraries News Center for the latest information on the Libraries.

The Human Genome: UB Libraries Celebrate BPS Science Week 2015

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STEMPhoto2Curious about DNA? Want to learn more about the human genome? Buffalo Public Schools Science Week 2015 celebrates the genome and the University at Buffalo Libraries and the Buffalo & Erie County Public Library have books for you!

Have a Nice DNA, The Boy Who Harnessed the Wind, The Borealis Genome and many more genome and science books for children, young adults and teachers are now available.

Librarians from the Buffalo & Erie County Public Library worked with experts from SUNY Buffalo State, UB, SUNY, the City of Buffalo and the Buffalo Public Schools to select the books and ensure their availability. The UB Libraries are proud to partner with them in support of STEM literacy by making these books available in the UB Libraries for UB students, faculty and staff:

  •  Genome & Science Books for Children & Young Adults: BPS Science Week 2015 – Guide, Pinterest
  • Genome & Science Books for Teachers: BPS Science Week 2015 – Guide, Pinterest

The UB Libraries also support the Read Aloud initiative encouraging parents to spend 15 minutes each day reading to their children – use the books above to get started. The UB Libraries offer many more resources 24/7 for your reading and research needs – see our website or contact us to learn more. Learn more about the science of life today at your library!

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Faculty 45, March 15, 1970

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One of the most sought out facets of University history is campus unrest and the events of Spring 1970.  March 15 marks the 45th anniversary of the “Faculty 45” incident.  On that day, 45 faculty members were arrested after holding a sit-in in Acting President Peter Regan’s office to protest presence of Buffalo police on campus.

Diefendorf Annex, September 1970

Diefendorf Annex, September 1970

University Archives has several items regarding the “Faculty 45” and campus unrest including:

  • 45 rpm record of “Hayes Hall Blues.”  This song was written about the faculty 45 by Charlie Keil and Michael Frisch in order to raise legal defense funds.
  • Trial transcript and other legal documents.
  • Notes and clippings
  • Flyers
  • Tear gas canister, buttons, strike flags, and banners

Interested in more resources?

Campus Unrest collections in University Archives

Flashback: Campus Unrest at UB by the UB Reporter

Timeline of Campus Unrest at UB

EndNote Workshops

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endx7_logoNew to EndNote?  The Libraries are offering free workshops tailored for those who have never used EndNote before and would like an introduction to this powerful piece of computer software.

Learn how to download the EndNote software, organize your references, images and PDFs, and how to instantly move references from EndNote into your Microsoft Word documents in virtually any citation style.

Check out our complete list of workshop dates and times, and register for an EndNote workshop today!

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Bayard Rustin on University at Buffalo Campus – 1961

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Bayard Rustin - August 1963 - Library of Congress photo

Bayard Rustin was an American leader in social movements for civil rights, socialism, non-violence, and gay rights. Rustin was a leading strategist of the civil rights movement from 1955 to 1968.

On October 27, 1961, he spoke in Norton Hall (now Squire Hall) on the University at Buffalo’s Main Street campus. (see “Rustin Speaking Today in Norton; Folksongs Will Highlight Program” Spectrum Newspaper, 27 October 1961)

Civil Rights – During the event, Rustin discussed civil rights issues. He clarified the purpose of CORE, the committee on racial equality. It was established, he said, not to alleviate the problems between “the white man and the black man, rather to do something about man’s injustice to his brother.” (see “Core Program Discussed by Rustin at Rally” Spectrum Newspaper, 3 November 1961)

Cold War – Before the Rustin lecture, the U.B. chapter of SANE (the National Committee for a Sane Nuclear Policy) held a demonstration on the steps of Norton Hall condemning Russian nuclear testing. Mr. Rustin spoke briefly on the problem of disarmament.

Three days later, on October 30, 1961, the Soviet Union detonated a 58-megaton yield hydrogen bomb known as Tsar Bomba over northern Russia, in the largest man-made explosion ever.


Rustin Speaking Today in Norton; Folksongs Will Highlight Program Rustin Speaking Today in Norton; Folksongs Will Highlight Program

Bayard Rustin will sing folk songs and speak on “Civil Rights and Non-Violent Mass Action” today at noon in Norton auditorium. Mr. Rustin is currently executive secretary of the War Registers League. He will also be available for discussion with students and faculty until 12 at a table in a private dining room in Norton.

An early advocate for non-violent mass action for civil rights, Mr. Rustin studied the Gandhi movement in India in 1948-49. For five years he was advisor and secretary to Martin Luther King. He has traveled widely in Africa, working with Nkrumah in Ghana, Azikiwe in Nigeria, and was arrested 22 times in race struggles. Mr. Rustin had recently returned from three months in Europe where he did preparatory work on the San Francisco-Moscow Walk for Peace.

Traveling under the auspices of the American Friends Service Committee, Mr. Rustin’s appearance at the University is sponsored by the Student Christian Association. Norman Whitney, national director of the peace education section of the American Friends Service Committee will also be available for conversation that morning in the private dining area.

—The Spectrum, October 27, 1961


Core Program Discussed by Rustin at RallyCore Program Discussed
by Rustin at Rally

by Joan Flory

Bayard Rustin, executive secretary of the War Resisters League, and advocate of non-violent mass action for civil rights, spoke last Friday in Norton.

His appearance was sponsored by the Student Christian Association, and the Student Senate Committee, and the Student Senate Committee on Segregation. A SANE sponsored demonstration on the steps of Norton preceded the lecture. Mr. Rustin spoke briefly on the problem of disarmament.

Richard Fey, vice-president of the Student Senate, read Senate President Les Foshio’s message condemning the Russian nuclear tests. There was also reference to the Soviet threat to explode a 50 megaton bomb. President Foshio was unable to attend the session.

Carl Zietlow, president of the SANE executive committee also addressed the students before the group entered Norton to hear Mr. Rustin speak on “Civil Rights and Non-Violent Mass Action.”

Initially Mr. Rustin clarified the purpose of Core, committee on racial equality. Core was established, he said, not to alleviate the problems between “the white man and the black man, rather to do something about man’s injustice to his brother.”

Core hopes to do away with injustice wherever it exists. First, said Rustin, man must erase the injustice in himself. The meaning of the Negro sit-ins and freedom rides was also discussed. They exist, the civil-right stated, to “make the nation face the facts…we desire integrated schools or no schools.”

When asked about non-violence as a part of their policy, Mr. Rustin said the “non-violence is important to us, for it is the only method capable of challenging and destroying an institution while simultaneously creating a better one.” This type of action was advocated by Gandhi, the Hebrew prophets, and the religious cults of the east.

Commenting on the plight of the Negro, Mr. Rustin recalled a quote from his boyhood: “Son do not worry about the white man, the hunter, being better off than you are. For keeping a man in the gutter you must sit on him, and you are in the gutter too.”

A question period followed in which the speaker elaborated on the civil rights issue in the south, the outbreak of violence, and the conditions prevalent in Harlem schools.

—The Spectrum, November 3, 1961

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2015 Undergraduate Prize for Library-Supported Research ($500) – Entries Due March 6, 2015

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ResearchPrizeThe UB Libraries, in cooperation with the Center for Undergraduate Research and Creative Activities, are pleased to sponsor and announce the 2015 Undergraduate Prize for Library-Supported Research.
The Prize recognizes students who produce significant academic inquiry requiring use of information resources, the University at Buffalo Libraries and the collections. Undergraduate research conducted by individual students or by student teams is eligible.

Research in all disciplines is eligible for the Undergraduate Prize for Library-Supported Research

  • Submissions must document use and application of library/information resources in any format (online, print, Web, media, etc.)
  • Research conducted in full or part during the period from January 2014 – February  2015 is eligible
  • Research projects can be presented in any format (print, web-based, media, database, art works, etc.)
  • Prize winning research will be featured on the UB Libraries and Center for Undergraduate Research and Creative Activities Web sites

One $500 prize will be awarded.

For more information and/or to apply, please visit: library.buffalo.edu/research-prize.

The application deadline is March 6, 2015.

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