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Archive for the ‘Archives’ Category

Music Library Presents Julius Eastman Exhibit

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The Music Library is pleased to announce its new exhibit, Performing the Music of Julius Eastman, currently on display in the library.  A summary of the exhibit is available online at

http://libweb1.lib.buffalo.edu:8080/xtf/data/pdf/music/exhibits/ubmu_pdf_eastman2017/ubmu_pdf_eastman2017.pdf

Julius Eastman portrait

Photograph by Chris Rusiniak

The exhibit contains writings about the multi-talented Julius Eastman (1940-1990) by three musicians who worked with him in Buffalo and New York City: Jan Williams, Joseph Kubera, and Bobby Previte. It also includes text by Eastman scholar Jeff Weston about the challenges presented by the notational practices of Eastman in his scores and text by John Smigielski about the three works presented on a famous concert at Northwestern University in 1980. The exhibit also features rarely-seen photographs of Julius Eastman by former Buffalo resident Chris Rusiniak.

Eastman’s music remained in relative obscurity until recently. Renée Levine-Packer and Mary Jane Leach co-edited a collection of writings about Eastman titled Gay guerrilla : Julius Eastman and his music in 2015 and the level of attention to Eastman’s life and career has greatly increased since then. While the Music Library does not hold a single Julius Eastman collection, it does hold extensive documentation about Eastman’s career here in Buffalo and at UB, both as a Creative Associate and as a faculty member.

The exhibit complements the Burchfield-Penney Art Center’s night of Julius Eastman events  Friday, Feb. 10th.   The program of events  is listed online at:

https://www.burchfieldpenney.org/events/event:02-10-2017-8-00pm-the-music-of-julius-eastman-featuring-percussionist-amy-knoles/ ,

John Cage June in Buffalo 1975 lecture available

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John Cage

The Music Library is pleased to announce that the John Cage Trust has generously provided permission to provide online access to a very significant lecture given by John Cage at the first June in Buffalo. The lecture took place June 5 1975, the day after a performance of Cage’s work, Song Books, by Julius Eastman and members of the S.E.M. Ensemble. The performance provoked a very strong reaction from Cage and the discussion at the lecture addresses some essential questions concerning “right and wrong” approaches to performing Cage’s music.

Of the many memorable moments in the lecture, the following poignant quote demonstrates how deeply the performance troubled Cage.

“What disturbs me so deeply is that our . . . that the history of our civilization is the history, isn’t it, not of the wars, as they tell us it is. . . but it’s the history of our . . . well, a history that includes Thoreau for instance. . . . Why can’t we learn? Why do we continually, when something is possibly beautiful, why do we find every way in our hands to trample on it? Why, when something could open our eyes, why do we close our eyes and pay no attention? I suppose we have to do it over again. It’s difficult to understand and perhaps there is no hope for us.”

You can listen to the lecture and follow a transcription of it at the following location:
http://libweb1.lib.buffalo.edu:8080/xtf/audio/ubmu0030_03.html

Music Library Exhibit featuring Cameron Baird, founder of the UB Music Department

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Cameron Baird

Cameron Baird

Paul Hindemith

Paul Hindemith
Photograph by Rudolph Hindemith

Did they or didn’t they? Come view the new Music Library exhibit, Cameron Baird: Bringing Paul Hindemith and Aaron Copland to Buffalo, and see how you would answer the questions: Did Paul Hindemith really teach at the University of Buffalo in 1940? Should Aaron Copland have been allowed to serve as the first Slee Lecturer in Music in 1957?

The exhibit addresses both questions, and includes letters, photographs, and newspaper articles that touch on greater issues of how politics before and after World War II shaped the careers of artists such as Hindemith and Copland. Excerpts from Copland’s testimony before the Senate’s Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations chaired by Joseph McCarthy are provided in the physical exhibit and a link to the full testimony is included in the online summary.

Aaron Copland

Aaron Copland

Cameron Baird is at the core of both stories. He shaped the musical culture of Buffalo in many ways and the stories presented in the exhibit demonstrate to some degree the range of his influence in the musical world at the time. The stories also provide a measure of his humanitarianism and courage in the face of political factors beyond the world of music.

The slightly expanded online summary of the exhibit is available online at:

http://libweb1.lib.buffalo.edu:8080/findingaids/data/pdf/music/exhibits/ubmu_pdf_baird2014/ubmu_pdf_baird2014.pdf

Women musicians in Buffalo: two local collections

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The Music Library possesses two small collections of special interest to researchers interested in women musicians in Buffalo. These collections are accessible through their respective online finding aids. They provide small documentary snapshots of women in Buffalo and musical traditions that merit more research.

The Pearl Radcliffe Lindal Papers, 1938-1947 (http://purl.org/net/findingaids/view?docId=ead/music/ubmu0043.xml)

Pearl Radcliffe Lindal (born April 22 1889) was a composer and music teacher in the Buffalo, New York area. She began to compose cowboy songs sometime in the 1930s and secured a contract from American Music Publishing for at least eight songs. She married Lewis Lindal , an attorney in Buffalo. She later remarried, becoming the wife of Richard R. Lennartz. She died November 25 1966 in Buffalo. The collection was received as a scrapbook of clippings and letters. It also includes eleven of Lindal’s songs, ten of which are contained within published song collections.

Hilda Schieder’s Drum Corps Records, 1938-1940
(http://purl.org/net/findingaids/view?docId=ead/music/ubmu0061.xml)

Hilda Schieder

Hilda Schieder

Not much biographical information has been discovered about Hilda Schieder. The telephone list in the collection shows her living at 144 Wohlers Avenue, Buffalo, New York. The meeting minutes in the collection show that the Hilda Schieder’s Drum Corps was established in June 1938 as successor to the Martha Washington Drum Corps. The collection includes Drum Corps meeting minutes, its constitution and bylaws, business correspondence, and three black and white photographs (available in digital format via links in the finding aid).

Passings of Allen Sigel and Eberhard Blum

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Allen Sigel

Allen Sigel

Former faculty member Allen Sigel passed away March 15 2013. Mr. Sigel began service on the Music Department faculty in 1953 as a part-time instructor. He joined the faculty full time in 1960 when he retired from his position as principal clarinetist of the Buffalo Philharmonic Orchestra. He retired from the faculty in 1992. Mr. Sigel was a composer and author in addition to being a clarinetist.  He wrote three pedagogical works for clarinet: Clarinet Articulation, Clarinet Masterwork Etudes: Mastering the Masterworks, and Twentieth Century Clarinetist.

The Music Library holds the Allen Sigel Collection of Scores, 1946-1998 which contains approximately 27 compositions by Allen Sigel. Many of them exist in multiple versions. There are also ten works by other composers in arrangements by Sigel. A description of the collection is available online at:


http://purl.org/net/findingaids/view?docId=ead/music/ubmu0032.xml

Eberhard Blum

Eberhard Blum

Eberhard Blum was a Creative Associate at the Center of the Creative and Performing Arts 1973-1976, and 1978-1979. Eberhard passed away March 5 2013 in Berlin. Mr. Blum was an extraordinary flutist who devoted his career to bringing contemporary music to an international audience. Throughout his career Eberhard Blum explored ways in which visual, musical, theater, and language arts could interact. He was well-known for his performances of difficult text works such as Kurt Schwitters Ursonate and a German translation of John Cage’s 45’ for Speaker. Eberhard Blum was also productive as a graphic artist. A few examples of his visual art are contained within his memoir, Choice & Chance: Bilder Und Berichte Aus Meinem Leben Als Musiker. In addition to the memoir, the Music Library also holds more than two dozen recordings by Eberhard Blum, including the 2012 release of a live performance June 12 2000 at June in Buffalo of Morton Feldman’s Crippled Symmetry with Nils Vigeland and Jan Williams.