Skip to Content
ublogo print

University Libraries

Charles B. Sears Law Library SUNY Buffalo Law School

Law Library News


Posts Tagged ‘Events’

Upcoming event: Buddhist Law and State Law in Comparative Perspective International Conference

Posted on: | by Nancy Babb | No Comments

When: September 30 – October 1, 2016
Where: 509 O’Brian Hall, UB North Campus
Contact: editor@buddhismandlaw.org

Join us for a two-day conference that builds on the edited collection, Buddhism and Law: An Introduction (Cambridge, 2014) by Rebecca French and Mark Nathan. It will also serve as the official launch of the first issue of the new peer-reviewed, academic journal, Buddhism, Law & Society (William S. Hein Publishing).

Synopsis: This two-day, international conference in the exciting new area of Buddhism, Law and Society will bring together scholars whose work touches on the theme of Buddhism and law from multiple perspectives and across a variety of regions and time periods. A key goal of this conference is to encourage new conversations and collaborations among scholars working in different areas.

Themes to be explored include the importance of different versions of the original Buddhist law codes in Sanskrit, Pali and vernacular sources; the key principles of continuity and discontinuity in the practice of Buddhist law in ancient and modern periods; and the differences in the conceptions and practices of ‘legality’ in monastic and state legal structures.

Participants will address monastic legal practices, the relationships between royal/civil law and Buddhist legal norms, law codes and documents, notions of legality (or harm, property, freedom etc.), the administration of temples and Buddhist sites, contemporary Buddhist legal activism and Buddhist-interest litigation.

All interested parties are welcome to attend. Please contact the managing editor of the journal, Buddhism, Law & Society, at editor@buddhismandlaw.org, for information on the conference.

shared from https://www.buffalo.edu/baldycenter/events/conferences/buddhist.html

First image of Law Library window display

Display window in front of the Law Library

Second image of Law Library window display

Tibetan note cards and other graphics on display in window in front of Law Library

Third image of Law Library window display

Cards and books in window display in front of Law Library

 

Upcoming event: “This Changes Everything”

Posted on: | by Nancy Babb |

Poster art by Shepard FaireyAll are invited to a special screening of the new climate change documentary inspired by Naomi Klein’s bestselling book, “This Changes Everything” (an Avi Lewis film).

When: Tuesday, September 20, 2016, 5:00 p.m.
Where: The Center for the Arts, University at Buffalo, North Campus

This event is free and open to all. There will be limited seating, so please plan accordingly.

Other links of interest:

Distinguished Speakers at the Baldy Center for Law & Social Policy

Posted on: | by Nancy Babb |

This Friday, September 9, marks the first Distinguished Speaker lecture of the semester.  Kenneth W. Abbott, Arizona State University, will present on the topic, “Experimentalist Governance 2.0: Taking ‘Experiments’ (More) Seriously.” This event will be held at 12:30 pm in the Baldy Center, 509 O’Brian Hall, University at Buffalo North Campus. More information: https://www.buffalo.edu/baldycenter/events/speakers.html#title_18
abbott20160909

Mitchell Lecture this fall: “Editing the Environment”

Posted on: | by Nancy Babb |

The Fall 2016 Mitchell Lecture will address the topic, “Editing the Environment: Emerging Issues in Genetics and the Law.” The lecture will be held on Friday, October 21, 2016, at 2:00 p.m. in the Center for the Arts, University at Buffalo (North Campus). This lecture is free and open to the public. Registration is not necessary.

Description:

“Emerging biotechnologies such as CRISPR and gene drives are ushering in a new era of genetic engineering. In this new era, the technical means to modify life are becoming cheaper, faster, more accurate, and more widely accessible than ever before. Gene editing technologies have already made it possible to engineer ourselves, our food animals, and our crops. More recently, they are also being developed to intentionally and rapidly alter or even drive to extinction species such as mosquitoes, with far-reaching implications for the management of human diseases, including malaria, dengue, Zika, and Lyme. In other words: gene editing technologies are increasingly granting humans the power to engineer life at all scales.

“What kind of futures do gene editing technologies portend and what imaginaries of progress, risk, and control guide their regulation? This year’s Mitchell Lecture will explore the complex cultural, scientific, ecological, legal, and normative implications of gene editing technologies for the future of life. Three distinguished speakers from law, science, and governance – as well as a dozen scholars from a wide-array of disciplines and professional backgrounds – will examine and problematize the evolving regulatory approaches to gene editing. The speakers and commentators will consider the potential impacts of contemporary gene editing technologies within, and beyond, the human.”

The facilitator is Irus Braverman, University at Buffalo School of Law and speakers include: Kevin Esvelt, Media Lab, MIT; Lori Andrews, Chicago-Kent College of Law; and Sheila Jasanoff, Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University.

More information: http://www.law.buffalo.edu/news/mitchell/2016-fall.html

2016 Mitchell Lecture, Part 2

Posted on: | by Christine Anne George |

2016 Mitchell Poster

The second of this semester’s Mitchell Lectures is here. On Friday, April 8 at 1pm, three speakers will address what changes in the legal profession mean for law schools and legal education. Get yourself in the Mitchell mood by checking out these articles by Friday’s speakers.

Susan Carle, American University Washington College of Law

Kevin Johnson, University of California Davis School of Law

Michael Schwartz, University of Arkansas at Little Rock William H. Bowen School of Law

We hope to see you at the Mitchell Lecture on Friday, April 8 at 1pm in 106 O’Brian Hall.

Gearing Up for the Mitchell Lecture

Posted on: | by Christine Anne George |

Mitchell Eye

We’re T-2 days from the 2015 Mitchell Lecture which means it’s time to get excited. If you need something to carry you over until Who Rules Big Data, you should check out some of the scholarship from the speakers.

EubanksVirginia Eubanks: An Associate Professor of Women’s Studies at SUNY Albany and a Ford Academic Fellow at the New America Foundation, will talk about technology and surveillance in the government administration of social welfare programs. To find out more about her work, check out the website for her book, Digital Dead End, (or check it out from Lockwood) and her articles on The American Prospect.

JohElizabeth Joh: A Professor of Law at the University of California, Davis, will talk about data analysis and surveillance in the criminal justice system. To find out more about her work, check out her articles “Policing by Numbers: Big Data and the Fourth Amendment” and “Privacy Protests: Surveillance Evasion and Fourth Amendment Suspicion.”

PasqualeFrank Pasquale: A Professor of Law at the University of Maryland, will discuss his new book, The Black Box Society: The Secret Algorithms That Control Money and Information. To find out more about his work, check out his book The Black Box Society and his op-ed from the New York Times, “The Dark Market for Personal Data.”

 

The 2015 Mitchell Lecture, Who Rules Big Data? Law, Knowledge and Power, will be held on Friday, March 27, 2015 at 2pm in 106 O’Brian Hall. The event is free and option to the public. For more information please visit the Mitchell Lecture’s page.

2015 Mitchell Lecture on March 27

Posted on: | by Christine Anne George |

Be sure to save the date. SUNY Buffalo Law’s 2015 Mitchell Lecture will be held on Friday, March 27 at 2pm in 106 O’Brian. This event is free and open to the public. Please register at the Law School’s website.

Who Rules Big Data? Law, Knowledge and Power will feature three speakers:

Virginia Eubanks (SUNY Albany) will talk about technology and surveillance in the government administration of social welfare programs.

Elizabeth Joh (University of California, Davis) will talk about data analysis and surveillance in the criminal justice system.

Frank Pasquale (University of Maryland) will discuss his new book, The Black Box Society: The Secret Algorithms That Control Money and Information.

For more information, please visit the Mitchell Lecture’s webpage.

2015 Mitchell

The Discussion on Drones

Posted on: | by Christine Anne George |
Christopher Rogers, Tara Melish, and Glenn Sulmasy

Christopher Rogers, Tara Melish, and Glenn Sulmasy

 

On September 25, the Buffalo Human Rights Center and the Federalist Society hosted a fantastic event. The U.S. Drone Policy in the Middle East: The Legal, Moral, and Political Implications panel featured Professor Glenn Sulmasy of the U.S. Coastguard Academy and Christopher Rogers of the Regional Policy Initiative on Afghanistan & Pakistan of the Open Society Foundations with SUNY Law Professor Tara Melish moderating.

Professor Sulmasy, who was speaking in a private capacity, addressed the nearly full room first. His talk (which was formally titled, “Foreign Affairs in Chaos: The Mideast, ISIS, and Drones”) highlighted the two important but very different perspectives that are at play in the debate about drones: what is permissible under foreign law and what is permissible under constitutional law. Mr. Rogers followed and discussed how there needs to be a globalized debate about drones because it is uncertain how drones fit into international law.

Once the speakers finished, Professor Melish opened the floor to questions. By the end of the event it was clear that there were no easy answers, but drone policy is definitely an issue worth discussing.

Everybody Loves the Law Library

Posted on: | by Christine Anne George |

Cuomo

In case you weren’t aware, the Charles B. Sears Law Library is totally the place to be. The latest proof of this fact? Governor Cuomo was here on Wednesday—his third time overall, but first as governor—to announce his proposed three-part Public Trust Act, which includes anti-corruption measures and campaign finance reform. To find out more about the visit check out the write up from the UB Reporter.

Just for fun, can you spot the three Law Library staffers in the above picture? (Hint: they look nothing like Waldo.)