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Charles B. Sears Law Library SUNY Buffalo Law School

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Posts Tagged ‘displays’

On Display

Posted on: | by Christine Anne George |

Mather Display

Near the entrance of the Law Library you may notice a new display. This faculty spotlight display is in honor of Lynn Mather’s article “Language, Audience and the Transformation of Disputes” (co-authored by Barbara Yngvesson) that won the American Political Science Association’s Law and Courts Lasting Contribution Award. When you stop in the Law Library, be sure to check it out!

 

It’s Millie Time

Posted on: | by Christine Anne George |

Mildred photo

Oscar? Who cares about Oscar? Here at the Law Library, everything’s coming up Millie. That’s right. Millies season is upon us!

Named for our first director Mildred Miles, The Millies honor law and the people who uphold it in film. Over the course of the next two weeks, the choice is yours. Who had the best negotiation/mediation? Who had the best courtroom scene? Which law or pre-law student is the most promising? And, finally, who is the favorite lawyer?

Anyone may participate. Voting will open on Monday at 3pm and close Friday at noon. You will be able to access the ballot via the Law Library’s blog. Results will be revealed each Friday on the Law Library’s blog. If you find you don’t agree with the nominees for a category, never fear—there will be a write-in option for each category.

Millies season starts Monday. Stay tuned.

Charles B’s Beach Reads: Fiction

Posted on: | by Christine Anne George |

Chillin CB

Summer is here and you know what that means…it’s beach reading season! We at the Charles B. Sears Law Library realize that you might want to put down the casebooks and dive into something fun. Here are our recommendations for Fiction.

When She WokeWhen She Woke by Hillary Jordan

In this futuristic retelling of The Scarlet Letter, criminals are genetically altered to have their skin dyed to reveal their crime. They are then released into a society where there is no separation between church and state.

Recommended by Christine Anne George

This title can be found at Lockwood

Abraham LincolnAbraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter by Seth Grahame-Smithe

Before he was president, he was a vampire-hunting lawyer from Illinois, determined to rid America of vampires…and slavery

Recommended by Terry McCormack

This title can be found at Lockwood

High CrimesHigh Crimes by Joseph Finder

In this legal thriller, Harvard law professor Claire Heller Chapman finds her perfect life disrupted when she has to defend her husband in a top-secret court martial.

Recommended by Christine Anne George

This title can be found at the Law Library

Final JeopardyFinal Jeopardy by Linda Fairstein

Fans of Law & Order: SVU will get hooked on this fictional series written by the former head of the Manhattan District Attorney’s Sex Crimes Unit.

Recommended by Christine Anne George

This title can be found at the Law Library

For more reading suggestions, check out our Exhibit page or stop by the display on the 2nd floor of the Law Library

Charles B’s Beach Reads: Classics

Posted on: | by Christine Anne George |

Chillin CB

Summer is here (even if today’s weather makes you think otherwise) and you know what that means…it’s beach reading season! We at the Charles B. Sears Law Library realize that you might want to put down the casebooks and dive into something fun. Here are our recommendations for Classics.

PWPudd’nhead Wilson by Mark Twain

A misunderstood comment, a fingerprint collecting lawyer, a baby swap, a set of Italian twins, and a murder all come together in Twain’s underrated critique of racism in society.

Recommended by Nancy Babb

This title can be found at Lockwood

 

BSBartleby, The Scrivener by Herman Melville

Follow the degeneration of a man whose job is to copy legal documents in a pre-electronic world. That is, unless you “prefer not to.”

Recommended by Nancy Babb

This title can be found at Lockwood

 

TrialThe Trial by Franz Kafka

Josef K. is arrested and put on trial, leaving him with two important questions: what crime did he commit and who decided it was a crime?

Recommended by Paul Ziolkowski, Terry McCormack, & Nancy Babb

This title can be found at Lockwood

 

CrucibleThe Crucible by Arthur Miller

In Miller’s play, 1690s Salem appears a lot like 1950s America as fear and malice feed into a hysteria about witchcraft that turns prosecution into persecution.

Recommended by Saadia Iqbal & Terry McCormack

This title can be found at Lockwood

 

For more reading suggestions, check out our Exhibit page or the display on the 2nd floor of the Law Library.

 

Seeing Red in Academia

Posted on: | by Christine Anne George |

The next time you’re in Law Library, be sure to check out the new display on the second floor by the main stairs. “Seeing Red in Academia” highlights a particularly interesting time in UB history when four professors and a librarian went all the way to the Supreme Court the challenge the loyalty oaths that every New York public school professor and teacher had to sign during the McCarthy era. Culminating in the 1967 Supreme Court case Keyishian v. Board of Regents, the UB faculty members gained an important victory for academic freedom.

24th Annual SOC Dinner

Posted on: | by Christine Anne George |

050306_Annual-Dinner_002

Tonight the Students of Color will be holding their 24th Annual Dinner. The dinner is to honor graduating students of color, alumni, and attorneys in the Buffalo Community who have made a lasting impression on the Law School. David L. Edmunds, Jr., Deputy Commissioner at the New York State Liquor Authority, will be the keynote speaker. Honorees include:

Anthony O’Rourke (Jacob D. Hyman Professor Award)

Remla Parthasarathy (Trailblazer Award)

Janice A. Taylor ’78 (Distinguished Alumni Award)

Paul Korniczky ’86 (Distinguished Alumni Award)

Anthony J.M. Jones ’04 (Distinguished Alumni Award)

To find out more about the keynote speaker and honorees, be sure to stop by and see the display on the second floor of the Law Library