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Archive for the ‘Digital Collections’ Category

Frank Sinatra on University at Buffalo Campus – 1941

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Frank Sinatra at UB's Norton Hall - September 22, 1941

On September 22, 1941, the Tommy Dorsey Orchestra perform in Norton Hall for Pep Week. Dorsey’s entourage included a young Frank Sinatra and drummer Buddy Rich.

The event was apparently well attended but received little coverage in the Bee Student newspaper.

Tommy Dorsey, the “sentimental gentleman” and his orchestra were in Buffalo, N.Y. for a week long engagement at Shea’s Buffalo starting on Friday, September 19th. (see “Comes Tommy Dorsey” Buffalo Courier-Express, 19 September 1941)

It’s interesting to note that Sinatra, only in his mid-20’s at the time, was just a “featured” performer and not the main attraction.

Added entertainers for the Shea’s shows included Paul Winchell, “world’s greatest ventriloquist,” and the Condos Brothers, dancing stars.

Both Tommy Dorsey and Frank Sinatra made good use of their time in Buffalo, N.Y. as both made in-store appearances at Rab’s Record Store, located at 1672 Main St, meeting their fans and signing autographs.


 

Buffalo Courier-Express, Saturday, September 20, 1941


Buffalo-NY-Courier-Express-1941-9-17COMES TOMMY DORSEY

Ace trombonist and band will be
at Buffalo Friday

Tommy Dorsey, “the sentimental gentleman,” and his orchestra, with all his radio and stage entertainers including Frank Sinatra, Buddy Rich, Ziggy Elman, Connie Haines and the Pied Pipers, will be seen on the stage at Shea’s Buffalo starting Friday. Added features will be Paul Winchell, “world’s greatest ventriloquist,” and the Condos Brothers, dancing stars. On the screen will be Dr. Kildare’s Wedding Day, with Lew Ayres, Laraine Day, Red Skelton and Lionel Barrymore.

Tommy Dorsey and his orchestra have appeared in many outstanding hotels, theaters and night spots. His fame has been enhanced by several national radio hook-ups. His records especially are in demand. He also is known as one of the greatest of all trombone players.

Among the better known engagements of Dorsey and his orchestra have been the Astor Roof in New York, the Palmer Hotel in Chicago, the Canadian National Exposition in Toronto and the famous Meadowbrook Country Club in New Jersey.

 

Buffalo Courier-Express, September 17, 1941

“The Work of a Country Doctor” Digital Collection

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The Work of a Country Doctor: Digitized Notebooks, Photographs, and Ephemera of Doctor Homer T. Jackson, M.D.The Work of a Country Doctor: Digitized Notebooks, Photographs and Ephemera of Doctor Homer T. Jackson, M.D. offers a fascinating glimpse into the practice of rural medicine a century ago.

Homer T. Jackson, M.D. (1846-1926), a graduate of UB Medical School, Class of 1881, practiced medicine for many years in the village of Verona, NY during the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

Dr. Jackson’s handwritten medical treatments and procedures, pharmacologic formularies, medical school class notes, and his notes and reactions to the professional literature of the day have been digitized and added to the UB Libraries’ Digital Collections.

Silver Creek Shakespeare Club

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Silver Creek Shakespeare Club Photograph, circa 1890

Silver Creek Shakespeare Club Photograph, circa 1890

by Joseph Patton, MLS ’15

The Silver Creek Shakespeare Club was founded in 1889 by Rev. Robert Newton Stubbs in Silver Creek, New York.  The club was founded to, as Rev. Stubbs expressed, “…give what pleasure we can get what benefit we may.”  Becoming a club exclusively for women after 1895, membership was limited to twenty five individuals with specific ballot casting to determine votes.  Members were required to consider all applications to the club.

The club focused on interpretive readings of the texts of William Shakespeare, as well as other figures and elements of English literature.  They generally focused on three to four plays during the year and had about twenty different meetings where discussions took place.  During the meetings there would often be food and entertainment to accompany readings of characters and history within each work.  Additionally, the club would observe specific holidays such as Twelfth Night (the first meeting of January), Shakespeare’s birthday, and the annual picnic that took place around July 4th.

In addition to their meetings and discussions, the club worked to assist other organizations within the community.  Among the groups they aided were the Red Cross, Crippled Children’s Protestant Home, and the Lee Library in Silver Creek.  The club was still active as of the donation of this collection in 1991.

A portion of the collection has recently been digitized by the University Archives and is available online through the University Libraries’ Digital Collection page.

*This post is part of an occasional series written by University Archives graduate assistants and practicum students.  To prepare students for careers in Special Collections, our graduate assistants survey, process, and describe archival collections, digitize items for online use, and provide reference service to patrons.  These posts allow our students to share their experience and impressions of working with primary source material in the Archives.

Bayard Rustin on University at Buffalo Campus – 1961

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Bayard Rustin - August 1963 - Library of Congress photo

Bayard Rustin was an American leader in social movements for civil rights, socialism, non-violence, and gay rights. Rustin was a leading strategist of the civil rights movement from 1955 to 1968.

On October 27, 1961, he spoke in Norton Hall (now Squire Hall) on the University at Buffalo’s Main Street campus. (see “Rustin Speaking Today in Norton; Folksongs Will Highlight Program” Spectrum Newspaper, 27 October 1961)

Civil Rights – During the event, Rustin discussed civil rights issues. He clarified the purpose of CORE, the committee on racial equality. It was established, he said, not to alleviate the problems between “the white man and the black man, rather to do something about man’s injustice to his brother.” (see “Core Program Discussed by Rustin at Rally” Spectrum Newspaper, 3 November 1961)

Cold War – Before the Rustin lecture, the U.B. chapter of SANE (the National Committee for a Sane Nuclear Policy) held a demonstration on the steps of Norton Hall condemning Russian nuclear testing. Mr. Rustin spoke briefly on the problem of disarmament.

Three days later, on October 30, 1961, the Soviet Union detonated a 58-megaton yield hydrogen bomb known as Tsar Bomba over northern Russia, in the largest man-made explosion ever.


Rustin Speaking Today in Norton; Folksongs Will Highlight Program Rustin Speaking Today in Norton; Folksongs Will Highlight Program

Bayard Rustin will sing folk songs and speak on “Civil Rights and Non-Violent Mass Action” today at noon in Norton auditorium. Mr. Rustin is currently executive secretary of the War Registers League. He will also be available for discussion with students and faculty until 12 at a table in a private dining room in Norton.

An early advocate for non-violent mass action for civil rights, Mr. Rustin studied the Gandhi movement in India in 1948-49. For five years he was advisor and secretary to Martin Luther King. He has traveled widely in Africa, working with Nkrumah in Ghana, Azikiwe in Nigeria, and was arrested 22 times in race struggles. Mr. Rustin had recently returned from three months in Europe where he did preparatory work on the San Francisco-Moscow Walk for Peace.

Traveling under the auspices of the American Friends Service Committee, Mr. Rustin’s appearance at the University is sponsored by the Student Christian Association. Norman Whitney, national director of the peace education section of the American Friends Service Committee will also be available for conversation that morning in the private dining area.

—The Spectrum, October 27, 1961


Core Program Discussed by Rustin at RallyCore Program Discussed
by Rustin at Rally

by Joan Flory

Bayard Rustin, executive secretary of the War Resisters League, and advocate of non-violent mass action for civil rights, spoke last Friday in Norton.

His appearance was sponsored by the Student Christian Association, and the Student Senate Committee, and the Student Senate Committee on Segregation. A SANE sponsored demonstration on the steps of Norton preceded the lecture. Mr. Rustin spoke briefly on the problem of disarmament.

Richard Fey, vice-president of the Student Senate, read Senate President Les Foshio’s message condemning the Russian nuclear tests. There was also reference to the Soviet threat to explode a 50 megaton bomb. President Foshio was unable to attend the session.

Carl Zietlow, president of the SANE executive committee also addressed the students before the group entered Norton to hear Mr. Rustin speak on “Civil Rights and Non-Violent Mass Action.”

Initially Mr. Rustin clarified the purpose of Core, committee on racial equality. Core was established, he said, not to alleviate the problems between “the white man and the black man, rather to do something about man’s injustice to his brother.”

Core hopes to do away with injustice wherever it exists. First, said Rustin, man must erase the injustice in himself. The meaning of the Negro sit-ins and freedom rides was also discussed. They exist, the civil-right stated, to “make the nation face the facts…we desire integrated schools or no schools.”

When asked about non-violence as a part of their policy, Mr. Rustin said the “non-violence is important to us, for it is the only method capable of challenging and destroying an institution while simultaneously creating a better one.” This type of action was advocated by Gandhi, the Hebrew prophets, and the religious cults of the east.

Commenting on the plight of the Negro, Mr. Rustin recalled a quote from his boyhood: “Son do not worry about the white man, the hunter, being better off than you are. For keeping a man in the gutter you must sit on him, and you are in the gutter too.”

A question period followed in which the speaker elaborated on the civil rights issue in the south, the outbreak of violence, and the conditions prevalent in Harlem schools.

—The Spectrum, November 3, 1961

Duke Ellington in Buffalo, NY – 1943

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Duke Ellington in Buffalo, NY - 1943On Friday, February 19, 1943, the 22nd annual University of Buffalo Junior Prom took place at the Hotel Statler main ballroom in downtown Buffalo, NY.

Duke Ellington and his orchestra were the musical entertainment for the event.

Duke Ellington (April 29, 1899 – May 24, 1974) was an American composer, pianist and bandleader of jazz orchestras. In 1943, he was one of the most popular musicians of the day.

At the time, he was considered the most outstanding musical figure to ever appear at the U.B. prom.

Due to war time conditions and a travel ban on pleasure driving, formal dress for the prom was optional.

For details, see “Duke Ellington To Play For Jr Prom” Buffalo Bee, 29 January 1943. and “Memorable Jr. Prom Features Queen, Duke” Buffalo Bee, 26 February 1943.

The Buffalo Bee is a part of the University at Buffalo Student Newspapers, 1921-1950 digital collection.